Core Courses and Electives

"Catholicism stands essentially for a universal order in which every truth of the natural or social order can find a place." -- Christopher Dawson

Catholic studies is an interdisciplinary program in the theology, history, artistic culture, philosophy, and traditions associated with Roman Catholicism.

Students who major in Catholic studies are required to take Religious Studies 101/102 as a prerequisites to the program and to take 36 credits in the program (i.e., 24 credits from the following core courses in Catholic Studies plus 12 credits from the electives listed below).

Students who minor in Catholic Studies are required to take Religious Studies 100 as a prerequisite to the program and to take 24 credits in the program (i.e., 18 credits from the following core courses in Catholic Studies plus (after consultation with the Program Coordinator) 6 credits from the electives listed below).

CORE COURSES:

101 The Catholic Story

An introduction to Catholic studies, the course focuses on a survey of major developments in the history of the Catholic Church: Early Christianity, the Papacy, Ecumenical Councils, Mission, Internal Reforms, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the Enlightenment, World Wars, and the Catholic Church today. Intertwined in this chronology are several themses: Freedom, Faith and Reason, Concepts of History, Sacraments, Spirituality, and Faith. Credit will be granted for only one of CATH 101 or CATH 100. Three credits.

102 The Catholic Imagination

Through a study of key texts of the Catholic intellectural tradition, students will investigate and examine themes such as: persecution, martyrdom, sin, moral life, death, faith, and divine love. Texts used will draw from different historical periods, a range of genres (autobiography, drama, poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose), and various types of authors (male, female, saints, mystics, religious, and secular). Credit will be granted for only one of CATH 102 or CATH 100. Three credits.

241 Sin and Salvation

This course will study the themes of sin and salvation as they appear in the Bible, in literature, and in two great theological controversies, the Pelagian controversy of the 5th century, and the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century. Three credits. Not offered in 2012-13.

245 Christ in the Catholic Tradition

This course will study the person, nature, and work of Christ as these are understood in the Catholic tradition. Texts studied will include the Bible, theological texts from a variety of historical periods, and some literary presentations of Christ. The class also looks at depictions of Christ in art. Three credits.  Not offered in 2012-13.

251 The End of the World

The purpose of this course is to give students an interdisciplinary understanding of eschatology, which is the study of theological and religious views about "last things" (death, heaven, purgatory, hell). This topic will be presented from three points of view: historical sources, including scripture; doctrinal issues; artistic depictions. Three credits.

301 Classic Texts in Roman Catholicism:  The Early and Mediaeval Church

An interdisciplinary seminar on the works of important thinkers in the Catholic tradition from the early and mediaeval Church, such as St. Augustine, St. Anselm, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Hildegard of Bingen. The seminar will normally focus on one thinker. Prerequisites: RELS 100 or permission of the instructor. Three credits. Not offered in 2012-13.

302 Classic Texts in Roman Catholicism:  The Early Modern and Contemporary Church

An interdisciplinary seminar on the works of important thinkers in the Catholic tradition from the early modern and contemporary Church, such as St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, John Henry Newman, Jacques Maritain, and Thomas Merton. The seminar will normally focus on one thinker. Prerequisites: RELS 100 or permission of the instructor. Three credits. Not offered in 2012-13.

321 Classical Debates in Science and Christianity

This course reviews the major historical developments in Christian teaching on science. The course has four parts: the understanding of the relationship between secular and Scriptural knowledge (or “reason and faith”) in the Early Church; creation and the philosophy of nature in the 13th century; Galileo and the Inquisition; and the 19th century debates over evolution. Three credits. Students may not receive credit for CATH 320 and this course. Not offered in 2012-13.

322 Contemporary Issues in Christianity and Science

This course examines contemporary issues related to science. Topics may include: modern Catholic responses to methodologies in the sciences; evolution and debates about the interpretation of the creation narrative in the book of Genesis; Catholic teaching on the meaning of human embodiment and its relevance to understanding sexuality and issues in bioethics; neuroscience and the phenomena of religious experience; the impact of contemporary cosmology, technology, and biology on Christian theology. Three credits. Students may not receive credit for CATH 320 and this course.

331: Catholicism and the Arts I

This course will trace Catholic themes and ideas about Catholicism in literary, musical, architectural, or artistic works from the beginnings of Christianity to the early Renaissance.  Three credits.

332: Catholicism and the Arts II

This course will trace Catholic themes and ideas about Catholicism in literary, musical, architectural, or artistic works from the Renaissance until the contemporary era.  Three credits.

341 Catholic Social Teaching

Rooted in scripture, philosophy, and theology, Catholic social teaching proposes principles of justice that emphasize the dignity of the person, the value of economic and political institutions, and the importance of a common good. This course explores these principles and their application to contemporary social, political, and economic issues with reference to official documents of the Catholic Church. Three credits. Prerequisites: CATH 100 or permission of the instructor or third-year standing.  Not offered in 2012-13.

ELECTIVE COURSES:
The following courses may be chosen as electives to complete the program in Catholic Studies.

Art    
ART 251 Medieval Art 3 credits
ART 252 Baroque Art 3 credits
ART 371 Italian Renaissance Art I 3 credits
ART 372 Northern Renaissance Art 3 credits
ART 373 Italian Renaissance Art II 3 credits
ART 435 Seminar in Italian Renaissance Art 3 credits
Celtic Studies    
CELT 230 Celtic Christianity 3 credits
English  
ENGL 207 World Masterpieces II 3 credits
ENGL 388 Heroic Literature of the Middle Ages 3 credits
ENGL 389 Chaucer's Contemporaries 3 credits
French    
FREN 318 Classical French Theatre 3 credits
FREN 319 Literary Works of the grand siecle (Les Moralistes) 3 credits
FREN 410 Medieval French Literature 3 credits
FREN 415 Renassance French Literature 3 credits
History    
HIST 363 Reformation Europe 3 credits
Music    
MUSI 315 History of Music I 3 credits
Philosophy    
PHIL 245 Philosophy of Religion 3 credits
PHIL 361 Early Medieval Philosophy 3 credits
PHIL 362 Philosophy in the High Middle Ages 3 credits
Religious Studies    
RELS 253 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament 3 credits
RELS 255 Introduction to the New Testament 3 credits
RELS 265 Introduction to the Gospels 3 credits
RELS 275 Introduction to Paul's Letters 3 credits
RELS 323 Mary and the Identity of Women 3 credits
RELS 325 Early Christian Women 3 credits
RELS 363 The First Christians 3 credits
RELS 365 Spirituality in Medieval Christianity 3 credits
RELS 383 Reformation Christianity 3 credits
RELS 427 Jesus the Christ 3 credits
Sociology    
SOCI 322 The Antigonish Movement as Change & Development 3 credits