New Student Registration Guide

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Registration Help Centre
(opening June 12th)

Hours of Operation:
Monday to Friday
8:30 AM to 12:00 PM and
1:00 PM to 4:30 PM
(Holidays excepted; times are   Atlantic Daylight Time)

E-Mail (preferred): nsr@stfx.ca
Local Phone: (902) 867-3645/3646
Toll Free: (844) 888-7337

Overview

Toolkit

It’s easiest to think of registering for your courses in two distinct phases:

  • Selecting Your Courses – finding the courses that are right for you and your program.
  • Registering for the courses you have selected.
Registration for new first-year students opens on July 11th or 12th, depending on your degree program.

To complete the registration process, there are a few steps that you should follow to mark your progress.

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FROM NOW UNTIL JUNE 15TH

It’s important to note that you will not be able to build your course schedule until June 15th. It is on that date, at noon, that the 2017-2018 course timetable will be available on this site.

Your task: Select your courses.

  • Familiarize yourself with the course selection and registration process.
  • Select the courses for your program and complete your course planning sheet.  Though you cannot yet build your specific schedule, you can still choose the courses that you want to include in your registration for the coming year.
  • View the registration information video for your degree program.  Choose the link for your degree program below, and download or open the file to view it. 

 

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FROM JUNE 15th UNTIL JULY 11th/12th

Your task: Build your course schedule. 

  • View the registration information video for your degree program (see above) if you haven't yet done so, or if you want to review the information.
  • With the Course Timetable (released June 15th), find your course section times and fill in your Course Timeblocks schedule.
  • On July 7th, registration start times will be set for July 11th/12th. Check your individual registration start time after noon on July 7th from the Registration menu in Banner Self-Service. (Note that prior to July 7th, all start times will be artificially set to a date in September...please ignore that date.)
  • Walk through the registration tutorial found in Step 4 of the process to be fully prepared for registration to begin on July 11th/12th.

 ON JULY 11th/12th

Your task: Register for your courses.

  • Log into Banner Self-Service and register for your courses at your earliest opportunity to ensure the best chance of getting a seat in your preferred sections.  Although you can register and make changes to your schedule throughout the summer, waiting to register will restrict your course and section choices.  It is strongly recommended that you try to register as close to your assigned registration start time as possible.

Your Registration Tool Kit:

 Before you begin, we recommend you print this Registration Toolkit to help you stay organized. The kit contains

  • Course Planning Sheet – use this to record the courses that interest you.
  • First-Term and Second-Term Course Timeblocks Sheets – use these to build your first-term and second-term schedules.

 

We are here to help!

This website will provide you with all the answers you need to select your courses and register successfully. If, however, you have questions for which you cannot find the answers, please contact us for assistance using the information found in the left navigation menu and at the top of the page.

When corresponding with us, please include your full name and StFX ID number to allow us to serve you most efficiently.

get Started  Step 1 - Get the Basics  

The Basics 

Course registration is the process of selecting and enrolling in the courses you need to satisfy the requirements for your degree. Students in most programs can build their own course schedules, selecting from courses which interest them and will meet their degree requirements.

Before you start registering in courses, you will learn about the course requirements for your program and about any required first-year courses. In the next step you will be able to select your courses based on the degree or diploma program into which you have been admitted.

Tips:
  • It is very important that you have access to the Current Academic Calendar as you work through these steps.
  • You will use your StFX ID number (as username) and Personal Identification Number (PIN) to log into Banner Self-Service and mesAMIS.
  • You will find your StFX ID Number and PIN in your confirmation email or package that was sent to you earlier this year.

get Started  Step 2 - Select Your Courses  

Selecting First-Year Courses for Your Program

In this step you will learn which courses are required for your program and how to explore optional courses.  You will make a list of the courses in which you want to register and enter them onto the course planning sheet in your Registration Toolkit.  Enter subjects, course numbers and specific course section information including course reference numbers (CRNs).
 
Tips on selecting courses:
 
- In most programs a full course load is 30 credits for the academic year (Sep-Apr). Normally this means five courses in each term.  For the two-year Diploma in Engineering the normal full course load is 36 credits, with six courses each term.  If you wish to register for less than a full course load for any reason you certainly may, but you should speak to an academic advisor to discuss any implications of doing so.  Contact the advisors at advising@stfx.ca.
 
- 3-credit courses are normally offered in one term:  1st term (Sep-Dec), or 2nd term (Jan-Apr). 6-credit courses are offered over the full academic year (Sep-Apr).  Students can be registered in five 3-credit courses each term; five 6-credit, full-year courses; or a combination of 3-credit and 6-credit courses.  Be sure that your final registration does not result in a course overload in either term.  You should be registered in a maximum of five courses each term (not including labs), unless you are a student in the engineering diploma, in which case six courses each term is standard.
 
- Choose your most important courses first (courses which are required for your program) and then the optional courses which you are most interested in taking.
 
- Select some alternatives for your optional courses, in case your first choices are not available.
 
- Explore subjects and courses which are new or unfamiliar to you...you may find new interests!
 
If you have completed Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or GCE A Level courses, please read this.
 

« To begin, please select your degree program from the list to the left.
(The Acceptance Letter which was mailed to you indicates your degree program.)

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts
with a Major in Aquatic Resources!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Aquatic Resources is very easy.  Most courses are required.  If you plan to do a Major in Public Policy and Social Research, there is only one course for which you will need to make a choice.  If you plan to do a Major in Economics, you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective subjects.

 
First-Year Course Pattern:  Public Policy and Social Research
AQUA 100 - Intro to Aquatic Resources: Natural Science Applications - 6 credits (full year)
ECON 101 - Introductory Microeconomics - 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 - Introductory Macroeconomics - 3 credits (second term)
ESCI 171 - Understanding the Earth - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 - Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
PSCI 101 - Introduction to Power and Politics - 3 credits (first term)
PSCI 102 - Introduction to Comparative and Global Politics - 3 credits (second term)
Anthropology or Sociology - 6 credits in one subject (see below)
 
ANTH 111 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology/Archaeology - 3 credits (first or second term)
ANTH 112 - Introduction to Socio-cultural Anthropology - 3 credits (first or second term)
OR
SOCI 101 - Foundations of Sociology - 3 credits (first term) 
SOCI 102 - Key Issues in Contemporary Sociology - 3 credits (second term)
 
If you are unsure which of these two subjects to choose, look at the upper-level courses in each discipline to see which appeal to you the most.  As you will be taking additional courses in this subject in future years, upper-level courses in which you have the most interest should dictate your choice of introductory-level courses.
 
 
First-Year Course Pattern:  Economics
AQUA 100 - Introduction to Aquatic Resources: Natural Science Applications - 6 credits (full year)
ECON 101 - Introductory Microeconomics - 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 - Introductory Macroeconomics - 3 credits (second term)
ESCI 171 - Understanding the Earth - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 - Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
Anthropology or Political Science or Sociology - 6 credits in one subject (see below)
Arts or Science course(s) - 6 credits, normally in one subject (see below)
 
Economics majors in the Aquatic Resources program must complete one of the following three options:
ANTH 111 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology/Archaeology - 3 credits (first or second term)
ANTH 112 - Introduction to Socio-cultural Anthropology - 3 credits (first or second term)
OR
PSCI 101 - Introduction to Power and Politics - 3 credits (first term)
PSCI 102 - Introduction to Comparative and Global Politics - 3 credits (second term)
                   OR
SOCI 101 - Foundations of Sociology - 3 credits (first term) 
SOCI 102 - Key Issues in Contemporary Sociology - 3 credits (second term)
 
If you are unsure which of these three subjects to choose, look at the upper-level courses in each discipline to see which appeal to you the most.  As you will very likely take additional courses in this subject, upper-level courses in which you have the most interest should dictate your choice of introductory-level courses.
 

Elective Arts/Science Subject for Economics Major
Your remaining 6 credits will normally be in another arts subject, though they could be chosen from the sciences. You may choose a second subject from the above three (anthropology, political science, sociology), or from any of the other subjects listed below. Click on each to learn more.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects  
 Anthropology  Mathematics (& Statistics) *
 Art (Art History and Studio Art)  Mi’kmaq
 Catholic Studies  Music
 Celtic Studies  Philosophy
 Classical Studies  Political Science
 Computer Science *  Psychology
 Development Studies  Public Policy and Governance
 English  Religious Studies
 French  Sociology
 German  Spanish
 History  Women’s and Gender Studies
* Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science is a department in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of pairs (see definition below) and electives in the BA programs, Computer Science and Mathematics are considered as arts subjects.
  
Science Subjects
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
 
Things to Remember
  • When building your course schedule, begin with required courses that are offered in only one timeblock, and schedule other courses around those.
  • When choosing your arts/science elective, explore your available options from the list above. You may decide to choose a subject that is familiar to you, but don’t hesitate to be adventurous and try something new. 
  • The BA degree requires the completion of “pairs”. (A “pair” is 12 credits in one subject – see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition). If you like your elective subject this year, you can take an additional 6 credits in that subject over the remaining years of your program and complete one of your pairs that way.

  • If you find, by year-end, that you are not interested in taking additional courses in your first-year elective subject, don’t worry. The BA degree also has open electives in its degree pattern. This subject may be used as an elective in your program, and you can choose different subjects in second year to use as foundation courses for pairs. So you can choose your elective this year risk-free!
 
Notes re Science Courses
  • Although BA students are permitted to take science courses, some of the science subjects may be more readily accessible than others during your initial registration.
  • Physics 101/102 and 121/122 are allowable science options for you. The department also offers two first-year astronomy courses, PHYS 171 and 172, which were developed for non-science students. You are welcome to take these astronomy courses as arts/science electives, but they cannot be used as part of a pair because upper-year physics courses require either PHYS 101/102 or 121/122 as prerequisites.
  • Chemistry may be restricted to science students until have all have registered. You may be able to register for CHEM 100 or 120 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the chemistry department chair to request to be added to a waiting list. Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in one of these courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the introductory chemistry course that you want.
  • Biology 112 is a required first-year course in your program.  If you wish to take more biology, you will most likely want to take BIOL 111 in your first year.  This course may be restricted to science students until all have registered.  You may be able to register for BIOL 111 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the biology department chair to request to be added to a waiting list.  Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in this course, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in BIOL 111.  (Note that BIOL 111 is only a 3-credit course, so you will need to choose a 3-credit course in another subject if you want to carry a full course load in your first year.)
 
Questions You Might Have
 
1.  I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and sciences subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course.  Although most students choose to do 6 credits in one subject for their 6 credits of arts/science elective (in the Economics Major), DEVS 101 plus 3 credits of a second subject would also work in your program.  If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in DEVS, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of DEVS, to include DEVS 201 and 202, over the remaining years of your degree.
 
2.  I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and sciences subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course.  Although most students choose to do 6 credits in one subject for their 6 credits of arts/science elective (in the Economics Major), PGOV 101 plus 3 credits of a second subject would also work in your program.  If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in PGOV, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of PGOV over the remaining years of your degree.
 
3.  Why is Earth Sciences not listed in the allowable Science Subjects above?
You are already taking ESCI 171 as part of your degree program.  In addition, your required AQUA 100 course serves as a substitute for ESCI 172 so AQUA students do not take ESCI 172.  You are therefore already taking the introductory level courses for ESCI this year.
 
4. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our other professional or applied programs: Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. (Aquatic Resources also falls into this category.)  Most courses in these departments are restricted to students in these programs. For future years, there are a 200-level Human Nutrition course and two 300-level Nursing elective courses that are open to students outside of those programs. If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these departments you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but such permission is not routinely granted.

 get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

 

 

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts in Human Kinetics!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts in Human Kinetics offers a lot of options. There are few required courses, and you have a variety of choice in the selection of your arts and elective subjects.

 

First-Year Course Pattern
HKIN 115 – 3 credits - first term
HKIN 105 – 3 credits - see below
Arts courses – 12 credits (6 credits in each of 2 arts subjects)
Arts and/or Science courses – 12 credits (normally 6 credits in each of 2 subjects)

 

HKIN 115 – Principles of Human Movement is a required 3-credit course offered in first term.

HKIN 105 – Activities
Your other 3 credits of required HKIN courses are 3 separate 1-credit activities (sometimes called skills). The course numbers for these activities are HKIN 105, followed by a letter designation that specifies the particular activity. For example, HKIN 105A is Soccer; HKIN 105DD is Indoor Soccer; HKIN 105M is Gymnastics; HKIN 105GG is Golf.

Each of these activities is offered over one-third of the year, rather than over the normal half-year (or term). The activities are offered as Fall (September – November), Winter (November – February) or Spring (February – April).

Normally, you will register in one Fall activity, one Winter activity and one Spring activity.

There are also HKIN 205 courses in a few activities. You must have completed the HKIN 105 course in that activity prior to registration in the 205. For example, HKIN 105V is Hockey I and HKIN 205V is Hockey II. You cannot register for 205V without having completed 105V. First-year students normally do not register in HKIN 205 courses, but if you were to take a 105 Fall activity and wanted to take the 205 counterpart in Winter or Spring, you could do so.

As there are many activities in each of the three “HKIN activity trimesters”, you should choose your activities after all other courses have been scheduled. More about this later.

 
Arts and Elective Courses
The above required HKIN courses for first year total 6 credits. That leaves you with 24 credits to choose from other subjects.

You will normally choose introductory courses (6 credits each) in four different subjects. You will need to choose at least two of your subjects from the arts. Most students in this program choose all four subjects from the arts, but you do have the choice of sciences for one or two of your subjects, if you wish.

When choosing your arts subjects, you should choose subjects in which you think you may be interested in taking additional courses in future years, and this is why: for your degree, you will be required to complete a minor (24 credits) in one arts subject and a “pair” in a second arts subject. (A “pair” is 12 credits in one subject; for full definition, please see the “Glossary of Terms”.)

If you already have a good idea of which two subjects these will be, that’s great. Make sure you take introductory courses in each of them. Then choose two more subjects of interest, either from the arts, or from the sciences, or one from each.

If you are like many students, and are as yet unsure which arts subjects will engage your attention and interest, don’t worry. You don’t have to make that decision this year. Explore the available options and choose courses that sound interesting to you. The good news is that even if you find yourself uninterested in further study in any of the subjects you take this year, all of the courses can still be used in your degree pattern, and you can choose two new arts subjects next year as a possible minor and a possible pair.

It’s reassuring to know that there are no “wrong” choices, and that you can explore your arts options risk-free! You may decide to choose subjects that are familiar to you, but don’t hesitate to be adventurous and try something new.

If you are considering applying to B.Ed. programs after completion of your Human Kinetics degree, see Question 6 at the end of this document for more specific recommendations regarding course choice.

 
Arts and Science Subjects

Below are the lists of arts and science subjects available to you. As you begin to explore your subject options, note that some first-year courses are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following tables are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects  
 Anthropology  Mathematics *
 Art (Art History and Studio Art)  Mi’kmaq
 Catholic Studies  Music
 Celtic Studies  Philosophy
 Classical Studies  Political Science
 Computer Science *  Psychology
 Development Studies  Public Policy and Governance
 Economics  Religious Studies
 English  Sociology
 French  Spanish
 German  Women’s and Gender Studies
 History  

* Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science is a department in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of pairs and minors in the BA HKIN program, Computer Science and Mathematics are considered as arts subjects.

 

Science Subjects
Biology
Chemistry
Earth Sciences
Physics

 

Notes re Science Courses

  • Although BA Human Kinetics students are permitted to take science courses, some of the science subjects may be more readily accessible than others during your initial registration.
  • If you are interested in Earth Sciences, the introductory courses are definitely open to you, and you are very welcome to take them. Note that the introductory Earth Sciences courses do not have labs, though they do have bi-weekly two-hour tutorials.
  • Physics is also an option, depending upon availability, and there are usually seats available for non-science students. (Note that in addition to the "normal" introductory physics courses, the department offers two first-year astronomy courses, PHYS 171 and 172, that were developed for non-science students.)
  • Biology and Chemistry may be restricted to science students until all have registered. You may be able to register for CHEM 100 or 120 or for BIOL 111 and 112 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the relevant department chair to request to be added to a waiting list. Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in these courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the science course(s) you want.

 

Things to Remember

  • Though the following tips may sound a little confusing at the moment, they will become clearer to you as you move along the process, and actually begin to build your schedule. You can always refer back to this page later.
  • When building your course schedule, be sure to begin with your required HKIN 115 course, as it is offered in only one timeblock. (This reference to timeblocks will also become clearer as you navigate through this website.) You will also have to register for an associated lab time, and there are several afternoon timeblocks from which to choose.
  • You should then schedule your arts courses (and science electives, if you’ve so chosen), leaving the choice of your three activities (HKIN 105 courses) to the end. Begin with arts and science courses that are offered at only one time, and schedule other courses around those.
  • The various HKIN activities are offered in six different timeblocks: A, B, C, D, K and L. After you’ve scheduled your other courses, you will have at least one or two of these blocks available to you, and most likely more. You will need to look for activities that fit into your open timeblocks.
  • When scheduling your activities, note that your Fall activity cannot conflict with any first-term courses, and your Spring activity cannot conflict with any second-term courses. Your Winter activity, however, bridges both terms, so has to be scheduled even more carefully, to avoid time conflicts with courses in both terms.
  • Your required HKIN 115 course is offered in D block in first term, so you will not be able to choose Fall or Winter skills that are offered in D1/D2/D3 (“D block”).

 

Questions You Might Have

1. I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in DEVS, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of DEVS, to include DEVS 201 and 202, over the remaining years of your degree.  If you decide to do a minor in Development Studies, you should complete DEVS 201 and 202 in second year, plus an additional 15 credits of DEVS over the remaining years of your degree.

2. I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and sciences subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in PGOV, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of PGOV over the remaining years of your degree.  If you decide to do a minor in Public Policy and Governance, you will need to complete either ECON 101 or 102 as part of that minor, so you may wish to take ECON 102 in second term if that course is not already in your plan for first year.

3. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our other professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Nutrition; Nursing. (Human Kinetics also falls into this category.)  These subjects cannot be used as minors or pairs, or as "arts/science” or approved electives. Courses in these departments are normally restricted to students in these programs (with the exception of one course in Human Nutrition, and two upper-level elective courses in Nursing). If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these programs you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but permission is not routinely granted.

Should you be permitted to take any of these courses in the future, you will be permitted a maximum of 6 credits and will have to use those credits in the “open elective” slot of your degree pattern. You are strongly advised not to consider doing so until later in your program. If you still want to explore the option of taking courses from these departments in first year, you should speak with the Human Kinetics chair or an academic advisor to discuss the implications to your overall program.

4. The Academic Calendar refers to “Subject A” and “Subject B”. What do these mean?
Subject A is your minor, in which you will have to complete a total of 24 credits over the duration of your degree. Subject B is your pair subject.

5. What if I am interested in an honours degree?
Course selection is no different for first year. You may wish to check table 4.1.5 in the Academic Calendar for grade and average requirements, so that you are aware of the grades you will need for admission to this program at the end of second year.

6. I want to do a Bachelor of Education degree after I complete my Human Kinetics degree. Are there any particular courses that I should be taking?
This answer will be given in the context of the StFX B.Ed. program. You should understand that each university to which you might want to apply could have slightly different admission requirements, and you should do some research on each university in which you might be interested. Overall, the admission requirements will be similar in many ways, but there will definitely be differences, and you’ll want to try to incorporate those different requirements into your HKIN degree.

At StFX, as at other universities, there are two basic streams of study in the B.Ed. program: elementary and secondary. The full explanations of these programs are found in the Academic Calendar, section 6. If you are interested in the B.Ed. program, you are strongly advised to read that section and to attend information sessions offered by the Faculty of Education (normally in October). The earlier you make yourself aware of the requirements for that program, the easier it will be to tailor your HKIN degree to fulfill the necessary requirements. The Faculty of Education loves to see first-year students attend those information sessions!

Following is a summary of section 6.1.3 and 6.1.4, with information as it pertains directly to courses offered at StFX.

 
For the elementary stream, there are five basic requirements:

(i) 9 credits of social studies from any one or any combination of the following disciplines: history, economics, political science, anthropology, sociology and/or philosophy. The introductory courses in any of these subjects will fulfill 6 of these 9 credits.
(ii) 6 credits of mathematics. The most common choice is MATH 101 and 102. One alternative is 6 credits of calculus (MATH 106 or 126, and 107 or 127).  A third option is 6 credits from MATH 101, 102, 106 or 126, 205; or one of these 3-credit courses plus 3 credits of statistics.
(iii) 6 credits of English. ENGL 100, or 111 and 112, will fulfill this requirement.
(iv) 6 credits of science. Your required second-year BIOL 251 and 252 will fulfill this requirement.
(v) 3 or 6 credits of developmental psychology. You will need to take PSYC 100 before being permitted to take the 6-credit PSYC 260 - Developmental Psychology or the 3-credit PSYC 354 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology for the Health Sciences I:  Childhood and Adolescence.

So if you’re interested in the elementary stream of the B.Ed., it would be wise for you to take ENGL 111 and 112 (or ENGL 100), 6 credits of “social studies” (as defined above), PSYC 100, and either MATH 101/102 or MATH 106/107 or 126/127.

 
For the secondary stream, there are two basic requirements:

(i) “Major Subject Field”: A minimum of 30 credits of university coursework in one discipline of a subject taught in Nova Scotia secondary schools. For you, this will be “Physical Education”, and your 54 credits of HKIN courses will more than satisfy this requirement.
(ii) “Minor Subject Field”: A minimum of 18 credits of university coursework in one discipline of a second subject taught in Nova Scotia secondary schools. Allowable subject fields are English; French; Social Studies (all 18 credits must be in one of the related disciplines: economics, history, political science, sociology, or anthropology); Mathematics; Science (all 18 credits must be in one of the related disciplines: biology, chemistry, earth sciences, or physics); Fine Arts (studio art or music); Gaelic; Spanish; Family Studies (which is not possible within the framework of the HKIN degrees); Business (which is not possible within the framework of the HKIN degrees). 

If you’re interested in the secondary stream of the B.Ed., you should think about which of the “Minor Subject Field” options you would want to choose. As a student in the BA in Human Kinetics, the science options are not open to you, but the others are. You should be sure to take an introductory course in that subject this year. If you’re uncertain, that’s okay. Take introductory courses in as many of the allowable subjects as you may be considering. Ultimately, the minor you choose for your BA HKIN degree will be your “Minor Subject Field” in a B.Ed. program.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts with Major!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts offers a lot of options. Whether you know exactly what you want to study in first year, or you are looking for ideas and want to explore new subjects, the BA program can accommodate you.

There are no required courses for the Bachelor of Arts degree program. However, there is a basic first-year course pattern to consider, and there are a few things to remember when choosing your courses. The good news is that there are no “wrong” choices. Whatever you choose to study this year, the courses will be usable in your degree program.

As you consider your course options, note that some first-year courses in the Faculty of Arts are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.  Two programs - Development Studies, and Public Policy and Governance - have only one 3-credit course each at the introductory level.  See Questions 1 and 2 below if you wish to take the introductory course in either or both of these subjects in your first year.

Most students choose to carry a full course load, which is a total of 30 credits. This means that students are registered in 5 courses each term. Should you wish to register in a reduced course load (fewer than 30 credits), you may certainly do so, but you should arrange to speak with an academic advisor to ensure that you are aware of the implications of doing so.

 

Things to Remember

  • The BA with Major degree requires a major and a minor. These are the two subjects in which you will concentrate much of your studies over the next four years.
  • If you are beginning your first year with a clear idea of your intended major and minor, be sure to include 6 credits in each of those subjects.  (If these include one or both of Development Studies, and Public Policy and Governance, see Questions 1 and 2 below.)
  • If you are debating among three or four subjects as possible majors and/or minors, be sure to include 6 credits in each subject you are considering.
  • If you have selected the Humanities Colloquium, three of your subjects have been pre-selected for you (English, History, Philosophy).  You will need to choose two others.  (See Question 4 below for more information about the Humanities Colloquium.)
  • If you have selected the Social Justice Colloquium, three of your subjects have been pre-selected for you (Anthropology, History, Women's and Gender Studies).  You will need to choose two others.  (See Question 5 below for more information about the Social Justice Colloquium.)
  • If you intend to do a program with Public Policy and Governance as your major subject, you will register for ECON 101 and 102; PSCI 101 and 102; PGOV 101; and 15 additional credits.  For those 15 additional credits, you will normally choose 6 credits of introductory courses in each of two other subjects, plus one 3-credit course in a third subject.  See Question 2 below for further guidance on course selection.
  • If you are one of the many who do not yet know which subjects will be of most interest to them, explore the options and choose courses that sound interesting to you. Remember that there are no “wrong” choices. In fact, some students do not find their true interest until second year, and that is still fine.
  • Whether you know what you want to study, or are still searching for your passion, seriously consider exploring at least one or two subjects that are new to you. The BA program, especially in first year, is a perfect opportunity for trying something new. You never know what unexpected interest you might discover.

 

Basic First-Year Course Pattern

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following tables are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

In your course selection, you should be sure to include courses from the two basic subject groupings below. Group I is composed of the humanities, and mathematics, statistics and computer science. Group II is composed of the social sciences and modern languages.

Group I Group II
 Catholic Studies  Anthropology
 Celtic Studies  Development Studies
 Computer Science  Economics
 English  Modern Languages (French or Spanish)
 History  Political Science
 Mathematics (& Statistics) *  Public Policy and Governance
 Philosophy  Psychology
 Religious Studies  Sociology
   Women's and Gender Studies

* Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science is a department in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of BA students, Computer Science and Mathematics are considered as arts subjects.

The following discussion about course selection is based on a student choosing to register in the full course load of 30 credits.

You should choose at least one subject from Group I and at least one subject from Group II. In addition, you should choose a third subject from either Group I or Group II. Each of the subjects in these two groups can be majors in the Bachelor of Arts degree program, so it is wise to ensure that at least three of these are included in your first-year course selection.

Besides the above three choices, you will choose two additional subjects. Your remaining two subjects can be from the selections in Groups I and II, and that is the choice that many students will make. However, you can also choose from a few other areas of study.
 

Additional Arts Subjects Science Subjects
Art (Studio Art and Art History) Biology
Classical Studies Chemistry
German Earth Sciences
Mi’kmaq Physics
Music  

It is highly advisable that at least one of your remaining two courses be an arts subject, chosen from Group I, Group II, or the “Additional Arts Subjects” list above.  (This is because BA students can complete only one pair, or a minor, in one science subject.  If you take two different science subjects, one of those can only be used as an open elective in your degree program.  You may certainly take two different science subjects if you wish, as long as you are comfortable using some of your open elective credits in your first year.)

Your final course(s) can be from any of the subjects presented above, but some of the science subjects may be more accessible than others for first-year BA students during initial registration.

If you are interested in Earth Sciences, the introductory courses are definitely open to you, and you are very welcome to take them. (Note that the introductory Earth Sciences courses do not have labs, though they do have bi-weekly two-hour tutorials.)  Physics is also an option and there are usually seats available for non-science students.  (Note that in addition to the "normal" introductory physics courses, the department offers two first-year astronomy courses developed for non-science students.  These astronomy courses can be used only as open electives in the BA program.)

Biology and Chemistry may be restricted to science students until all have registered. You may be able to register in Chemistry or Biology courses when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the relevant department chair to request to be added to a waiting list.  Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in these courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the science course(s) you want.

 

Summary of 5 Subjects for First Year 

(This will differ slightly for students planning to take DEVS 101 and/or PGOV 101.)

  1. Group I subject
  2. Group II subject
  3. Group I or Group II subject (different subject from 1 and 2 above)
  4. Arts subject – from Group I, Group II or “Additional Arts Subjects” list
  5. Another subject!
     

Questions You Might Have

1. I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course.  If you plan to use DEVS as a joint major, honours, subsidiary, minor, or pair subject, you will take DEVS 201 and 202 in second year.  If you plan to do a joint major or honours in DEVS, you should also take ECON 101 and 102 in first year, as these courses are required for the major or honours.  If you intend to do a minor or more in Development Studies, you should read the Subject Page for Development Studies, found at the link in the table above, for further guidance on first-year course selection.

2. I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level.  What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course.  If you plan to do PGOV as a major or honours subject, you could opt to take STAT 101 in second term, since that is a required 3-credit course for those programs.  (This would be in addition to ECON 101 and 102, and PSCI 101 and 102, as outlined in the "Things to Remember" section above.)  If you intend to do a minor in Public Policy and Governance, and have not already chosen to do ECON 101 and 102 as part of your first-year schedule, you could choose ECON 102 for second semester since either ECON 101 or 102 must be completed as part of the minor in PGOV.  If you intend to do a minor or more in Public Policy and Governance, you should read the Subject Page for Public Policy and Governance, found at the link in the table above, for further guidance on first-year course selection.

3. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. Most courses in these departments are restricted to students in these programs. There are a couple of exceptions, however. BSAD 101 and 102 are available to non-business students, if there are seats available after registration has concluded for first-year students, but these courses are only usable as open electives in the BA program (or in a Business Administration minor with an Economics major). There are also a 200-level Human Nutrition course and two 300-level Nursing elective courses that are open to students outside of those programs. If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these departments you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but such permission is not routinely granted.

4. What is the Humanities Colloquium?
The Humanities Colloquium is an opportunity for first-year Bachelor of Arts students to study Western Civilization with an interdisciplinary focus on the great books. It offers ENGL 100 (Introduction to Literature and Critical Writing), HIST 101 (Western Civilization:  Earliest Civilizations to the War of Religion), HIST 102 (Western Civilization:  Columbus to Decolonization), and PHIL 100 (Introductory Philosophy) in an integrated, chronologically coordinated way. If you have an interest in these courses, investigate the option of this unique enhanced learning experience here.

5. What is the Social Justice Colloquium?
The Social Justice Colloquium is an opportunity for first-year Bachelor of Arts students to consider why inequality exists and how we can work together to create a world with greater opportunities for all people. It offers ANTH 111 (Introduction to Physical Anthropology / Archaeology), ANTH 112 (Introduction to Socio-cultural Anthropology), HIST 111 (Introduction to Global History 1300-1795), HIST 112 (Introduction to Global History from 1789), and WMGS 100 (Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies) in a coordinated format to encourage the study of social justice from various perspectives. If you have an interest in these courses, investigate the option of this unique enhanced learning experience here.

6. What if I am interested in an honours or an advanced major degree?
Course selection is no different for first year. You may wish to check table 4.1.5 in your Academic Calendar for grade and average requirements, so that you are aware of the grades you will need for admission to these programs at the end of second year.
 

 

 

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

 

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts and Science in Health!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts and Science in Health is very simple. All courses are required and your registration in those courses will be done for you.
 
 
First-Year Course Pattern

CHEM 100 – General Chemistry - 6 credits (full year)

PSYC 100 – Introduction to Psychology - 6 credits (full year)

BIOL 111 – Introductory Cell Biology - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 – Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
HLTH 101 – Fundamentals of Health I - 3 credits (first term)
HLTH 102 – Fundamentals of Health II - 3 credits (second term)
SOCI 101 – Foundations of Sociology - 3 credits (first term)
SOCI 102 – Key Issues in Contemporary Sociology - 3 credits (second term)

In total, you will be taking 5 courses each term.

 

 

Feel free to browse through the "Academic Subjects" pages, found under the "Helpful Resources" side-link.  They will provide more information about the courses in which you will be registered in the coming year.

 

Question You Might Have

Is it possible to take fewer than 30 credits this year?
If you wish to take a reduced course load, you should meet with an academic advisor before classes start, or during the first week of classes.  If you plan to do your degree over 5 years rather than over 4 years, there will be no problem, but you will still need to plan your program carefully.  If you plan to do a reduced course load for this one year only, and then take the normal full course load in subsequent years, an advisor can assist you with the best complement of courses for the coming year that will allow you to complete your degree within the four-year period.  This will, of course, require your taking spring and/or summer courses over the next three years.
 
 

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of
Business Administration with Major!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Business Administration with Major is very easy. There are some required courses, and you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective subjects from the arts and sciences.

 

First-Year Course Pattern
BSAD 101 – Introduction to Business – 3 credits (first term)
BSAD 102 – Business Decision-Making – 3 credits (second term)
ECON 101 – Introductory Microeconomics – 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 – Introductory Macroeconomics – 3 credits (second term)
MATH 105 – Business Mathematics – 3 credits (normally first term)
STAT 101 (B) – Introductory Statistics – 3 credits (normally second term)
Arts course(s) – 6 credits in one subject
Arts or Science course(s) – 6 credits in one subject

 

Required Courses
Six of the courses in your program are 3-credit courses that are offered either in first term or in second term, as outlined above. Note that MATH 105 and STAT 101 may be taken in either term; however, you will normally choose MATH 105 in first term and STAT 101 in second term.  These BSAD (Business Administration), ECON (Economics), MATH (Mathematics) and STAT (Statistics) courses are required courses for all programs in the Bachelor of Business Administration. 

 

Arts/Science Elective Requirements
You will choose 6 credits in each of two subjects from the arts and sciences. Most BBA students choose two arts subjects. You may choose one arts subject and one science subject if you wish, but please see “Notes re Science Courses” below for possible restrictions on science options.

Note that some first-year courses in the arts and sciences are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject. 

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following tables are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.  

Arts Subjects  
 Anthropology  Mathematics *
 Art (Art History and Studio Art)  Mi’kmaq
 Catholic Studies  Music
 Celtic Studies  Philosophy
 Classical Studies  Political Science
 Computer Science *  Psychology
 Development Studies  Public Policy and Governance
 English  Religious Studies
 French  Sociology
 German  Spanish
 History  Women’s and Gender Studies
*Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science is a department in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of pairs and electives in the BBA program, Computer Science and Mathematics are considered as arts subjects.

 

Science Subjects
Biology
Chemistry
Earth Sciences
Physics

 

Things to Remember

  • When making your elective choices for this year, explore your options! You may decide to choose courses in subjects that are familiar to you, but don’t hesitate to be adventurous and try something new.
  • As you’re making your choices, it is advisable to choose subjects that appeal to you, and in which you think you might be interested in taking an additional course or two in the future. The BBA degree requires the completion of 36 credits of arts/science electives over the course of the program. 24 of these credits must be completed as two 12-credit “pairs”. (A “pair” is 12 credits in one subject – see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition.) If you really like both of your elective subjects this year, you can take an additional 6 credits in each subject over the remaining years of your program and complete your two pairs that way.
  • At least one of your two pairs must be in an arts subject.
  • If you find, by year-end, that you are not interested in taking additional courses in either of your first-year elective subjects, don’t worry. You won’t have to. Arts and science courses taken in first year, and not subsequently paired, can be used to satisfy the other arts/science electives for your program.
  • Whether you ultimately decide to pair both, only one, or neither of the elective subjects that you choose for this year, be reassured that those courses will be usable in your BBA program. You can choose your arts/science electives this year risk-free!

 

Notes re Science Courses

  • Although BBA students are permitted to take science courses, some of the science subjects may be more readily accessible than others during your initial registration.
  • If you are interested in Earth Sciences, ESC I 171 and 172 are available to you. Note that these two Earth Sciences courses do not have labs, though they do have bi-weekly two-hour tutorials.
  • Physics 101/102 or 121/122 are allowable science options for you. The department also offers two first-year astronomy courses, PHYS 171 and 172, which were developed for non-science students. You are welcome to take these astronomy courses as arts/science electives, but they cannot be used as part of a pair because upper-year physics courses require either PHYS 101/102 or 121/122 as prerequisites.
  • Biology and Chemistry may be restricted to science students until have all have registered. You may be able to register for CHEM 100 or 120 or for BIOL 111 and 112 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the relevant department chair to request to be added to a waiting list. Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in these courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the science course(s) that you want.

 

Questions You Might Have

1. I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in DEVS, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of DEVS, to include DEVS 201 and 202, over the remaining years of your degree. If you decide to do a minor in Development Studies (see #6 below), you should complete DEVS 201 and 202 in second year, plus an additional 15 credits of DEVS over the remaining years of your degree.

2. I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts and science subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in PGOV, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of PGOV over the remaining years of your degree. If you decide to do a minor in Public Policy and Governance (see #6 below), you should complete PGOV 201 and 202 in second year, plus an additional 15 credits of PGOV over the remaining years of your degree.

3. I would like to take more Economics courses after first year. Will I be permitted to do an Economics pair?
The introductory Economics courses, ECON 101 and 102, are required first-year courses and part of your degree requirements, so cannot also be used as part of an Economics pair. However, if you were to take an additional 12 credits of Economics over the remaining three years of your program, you could complete an Economics pair in that way.

4. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our Faculty of Science professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. Courses in these departments are normally restricted to students in these programs. If you are interested in taking a course in one of these subjects, you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but permission is not routinely granted. Check the relevant link on the “Academic Subjects” page for further information, and possible exceptions.

These courses are not considered arts or science courses, so cannot be used to fulfill your pair requirements or your “arts/science elective” requirements. The BBA program does include 9 credits of open electives, which may include courses in these subjects if you’re granted permission to take them. This option is still available later in your program. You should concentrate on arts/science courses for your electives this year.

5. Do I have to take any science electives in my BBA program?
You are not required to take any science courses. Both of your pairs and all of your arts/science electives may be in arts subjects. Science courses serve as additional options for you.

6. I know that I can complete a minor in the BBA. How does that work?
A minor is an option in the BBA, though it is not a requirement. A minor is 24 credits in one subject, beyond any required courses in your program. Your minor would be composed of one of your pairs, plus 12 additional credits in that same subject, for a total of 24 credits. You may complete a minor only in an arts or science subject, and not in a subject from any of the professional or applied programs (that is, not in Aquatic Resources, Engineering, Health, Human Kinetics, Human Nutrition, or Nursing).  Be sure to make yourself aware of any specific requirements for a minor, as outlined by the relevant department. (See the appropriate department section in Chapter 9 of the Academic Calendar for information on such requirements.) Any department that does not specify requirements for its minor will allow any 24 credits to fulfill that designation.

If you choose to complete a minor, remember that you must also complete a second pair in a different subject.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Science
with a Major in Aquatic Resources!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Aquatic Resources is very easy. Most of your courses are required, and you have the choice of one additional science subject.

 

First-Year Course Pattern
AQUA 100 – Intro to Aquatic Resources: Natural Science Applications - 6 credits (full year)
ECON 101 - Introductory Microeconomics - 3 credits (first term)
ECON 102 – Introductory Macroeconomics - 3 credits (second term)
ESCI 171 – Understanding the Earth - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 – Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
MATH 111 – Calculus I - 3 credits (first term)
MATH 112 – Calculus II - 3 credits (second term)
Science course - 6 credits in one subject (see below)
 

Elective Science Requirement
In addition to the above required courses, which total 24 credits, you will choose 6 credits in one other science subject.

If you intend a major in biology or Earth sciences, CHEM 100, a 6-credit, full-year course, is recommended. This course is required for each of these two majors, so it is advisable to take it in first year.

If you intend a major in Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science, you may choose an introductory course in chemistry (CHEM 100 or 120) or in physics (PHYS 100 or 120), or introductory courses in computer science (CSCI 161 and 162).  Normally, students in mathematics will choose CHEM 120 or PHYS 120. However, the choice is yours.

 
Something to Remember
When building your course schedule, be sure to begin with required courses that are offered in only one timeblock, and schedule other courses around those.

  
Question You Might Have

What if there is another course that I want to take first year, rather than my science elective?
It is recommended that students follow the normal course pattern, in order to ensure an easier progression through the remaining years of the program. Courses in first year will be prerequisites to courses in subsequent years. Taking courses “out of order” can result in difficulties in future years. However, you may contact the program coordinator or the program assistant for individual advising questions such as these. There may be adjustments that are possible with your particular program plan.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Science
in Human Kinetics!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics offers a few options. The first decision that you have to make is which stream of the degree you want to follow. There is a basic pattern that applies to all three streams, but some have more specific requirements than others. Let’s start with an overview of the first-year course load, and the similarities across streams in the BSC HKIN degree.

 

First-Year Course Pattern (regardless of the stream you follow):
HKIN 115 – 3 credits
HKIN 105 – 3 credits
Science courses – 12 credits (6 credits in each of 2 science subjects)
Arts courses – 12 credits (6 credits in each of 2 arts subjects)

 

HKIN 115 – Principles of Human Movement is a required 3-credit course offered in first term.

HKIN 105 – Activities
Your other 3 credits of required HKIN courses are 3 separate 1-credit activities (sometimes called skills). The course numbers for these activities are HKIN 105, followed by a letter designation that specifies the particular activity. For example, HKIN 105A is Soccer; HKIN 105DD is Indoor Soccer; HKIN 105M is Gymnastics; HKIN 105GG is Golf.

Each of these activities is offered over one-third of the year, rather than over the normal half-year (or term). The activities are offered as Fall (September – November), Winter (November – February) or Spring (February – April).

Normally, you will register in one Fall activity, one Winter activity and one Spring activity.

There are also HKIN 205 courses in a few activities. You must have completed the HKIN 105 course in that activity prior to registration in the 205. For example, HKIN 105V is Hockey I and HKIN 205V is Hockey II. You cannot register for 205V without having completed 105V. First-year students normally do not register in HKIN 205 courses, but if you were to take a 105 Fall activity and wanted to take the 205 counterpart in Winter or Spring, you could do so.

As there are many activities in each of the three “HKIN activity trimesters”, you should choose your activities after all other courses have been scheduled. More about this later.

 
Choose Your Stream
At this point, you need to think about your particular stream. There are three options to consider, and they relate to the minor you want to complete within your degree.

  1. Health Sciences is a minor intended for students who are considering further study in any of the health sciences fields (for example, medical school, dentistry, physiotherapy). The “minor” is not in one subject, as is the norm for a minor, but is rather a set of courses that allows students to take the myriad of courses recommended and required for admission to various health sciences programs. This minor is composed of specific biology, chemistry and physics courses.  Students intending to pursue further study in the health sciences are not required do do the Health Sciences minor, although those who plan to write the MCAT for medical school admission will find this minor to be the most logical choice.  Those intending dentistry, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, or pharmacy will easily be able to accommodate all required undergraduate courses within another minor, if they so choose.
  2. The minor in Nutrition requires several specific science courses, in addition to the human nutrition courses, and students need to ensure that they take those foundational science courses in first year to be properly prepared for other required courses in subsequent years.
  3. Students may complete a minor in any one science (biology, chemistry, computer science, Earth sciences, mathematics, or physics).

If you’re unsure which stream to choose, you would be advised to choose the stream that is most specific from among the ones you are considering. The good news is that students often do change their minds about their streams, and they’re fine. There is enough flexibility within the first year to allow students to make changes in second year, and sometimes even beyond. To make your path smoothest, however, choose the most restrictive stream in which you’re interested, and you’ll be fine.

 

Health Sciences Minor
This is the most restrictive stream. Course choice for this stream is the easiest, however, because you have a choice in only two of your requirements. You will take…

BIOL 111 – Introductory Cell Biology - 3 credits (first term)
BIOL 112 – Diversity of Life - 3 credits (second term)
CHEM 100 – General Chemistry - 6 credits (full year)
 
 
ENGL 100 – Introduction to Literature and Critical Writing - 6 credits (full year)
or
ENGL 111  Literature and Academic Writing I - 3 credits (first term) 
ENGL 112  Literature and Academic Writing II - 3 credits (second term)
 
 
PSYC 100 – Introduction to Psychology - 6 credits (full year)
      or
SOCI 101 – Foundation of Sociology - 3 credits (first term)
SOCI 102  Contemporary Sociology - 3 credits (second term)

If you are contemplating a physiotherapy program after completion of your HKIN degree, you should choose PSYC 100 rather than SOCI 101 and 102 because introductory psychology is a required course for admission to that program at Dalhousie University.

 
Nutrition Minor
Course choice for this stream has required science courses, but you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective arts subjects. Your science courses are the same as those for the Health Sciences minor:

BIOL 111 – Introductory Cell Biology (first term, 3 credits)
BIOL 112 – Diversity of Life (second term, 3 credits)
CHEM 100 – General Chemistry (full year, 6 credits)

Your options for arts subjects are listed below, and apply both to the nutrition minor stream, and to the following stream, in which students complete a minor in one science subject.

 
Minor in One Science
Course choice for this stream is dependent on your intended minor. Most students choose to minor in biology, but any one of the sciences is an allowable option.

  • Biology minors will choose BIOL 111 and 112 and CHEM 100, the same combination of science courses in the other two streams.
  • Chemistry minors will choose CHEM 120 or 100, and 6 credits of introductory course(s) in one of the other sciences. PHYS 100 or 120 is a good companion course, but is not required.
  • Computer Science minors will choose CSCI 161 and 162, and 6 credits of introductory course(s) in one of the other sciences.
  • Earth Sciences minors will choose ESCI 171 and 172, and 6 credits of introductory course(s) in one of the other sciences. CHEM 100 or 120 is highly recommended as the second science, as some upper-year ESCI courses require chemistry as a prerequisite.
  • Physics minors will choose PHYS 120, and normally MATH 111 and 112 (calculus). In this instance, the calculus courses serve as the second science.  Calculus is recommended as the second science because it is a prerequisite for many upper-year physics courses.
  • Mathematics minors will choose MATH 111 and 112, and 6 credits of introductory course(s) in one of the other sciences.

As with the nutrition minor, you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective arts subjects.

 

Arts Requirements
The normal first-year course pattern requires you to take courses in two different arts subjects. If you are following the Health Sciences Minor stream, your options are limited, as outlined above. If you are following either of the other two streams, you may choose courses from any two of the subjects below.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects  
Anthropology Mi’kmaq
Art (Art History and Studio Art) Music
Catholic Studies Philosophy
Celtic Studies Political Science
Classical Studies Psychology
Development Studies Public Policy and Governance
Economics Religious Studies
English Sociology
French * Spanish *
German * Women’s and Gender Studies
History  

* Human Kinetics students interested in languages should take only one of these modern language subjects in first year. See question 3 at the end of this document for further explanation.

Take the opportunity to explore subjects that are new to you as you contemplate your options for arts courses. Note that some first-year courses in the Faculty of Arts are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.

When you choose your arts subjects, remember that you will ultimately be required to complete a total of 12 credits in one arts subject as part of your degree requirements. This requirement is called a “pair”. (For the full definition of a “pair”, please see the “Glossary of Terms”.) You may decide, as most students do, to complete your pair in one of the arts subjects that you take in first year. To accomplish this, you will complete a second 6 credits in that subject, normally in second year.

However, if you find at year-end that you are not interested in taking more courses in either of the arts subjects you took in first year, you will not be required to do so. You will be able to try a new arts subject in second year, and take the second 6 credits of that subject in third or fourth year to complete your pair requirement.

So you can explore your first-year arts options risk-free! Take courses that you know you’ll really like, or be adventurous and try something new!

If you are considering applying to B.Ed. programs after completion of your Human Kinetics degree, see Question 6 at the end of this document for more specific recommendations regarding course choice.

 

Things to Remember

  • Though the following tips may sound a little confusing at the moment, they will become clearer to you as you move along the process, and actually begin to build your schedule. You can always refer back to this page later.
  • When building your course schedule, be sure to begin with your required HKIN 115 course, as it is offered in only one timeblock. (This reference to timeblocks will also become clearer as you navigate through this website.) You will also have to register for an associated lab time, and there are several afternoon timeblocks from which to choose.
  • You should then schedule your science courses and labs, as there are fewer timeblock options available for those than for most of the arts courses. When choosing lab times, you should try to avoid morning labs, as those will result in time conflicts with many of the activities courses.
  • You should next schedule your arts courses. Begin with courses that are offered at only one time, and schedule other courses around those. If you have to make adjustments to your science courses because a desired arts course is offered at only one time and it conflicts with a science course, then do so. Work back and forth among courses until you can fit everything into your schedule with no time conflicts. If there is no way to fit all of your desired courses into your schedule, you may need to change your choice of one or both arts courses. Your science courses are of most importance to your program, so be sure to get those scheduled as your top priority.
  • The various HKIN activities are offered in six different timeblocks: A, B, C, D, K and L. After you’ve scheduled your other courses, you will have at least one or two of these blocks available to you, and most likely more. You will need to look for activities that fit into your open timeblocks.
  • When scheduling your activities, note that your Fall activity cannot conflict with any first-term courses, and your Spring activity cannot conflict with any second-term courses. Your Winter activity, however, bridges both terms, so has to be scheduled even more carefully, to avoid time conflicts with courses in both terms.
  • Your required HKIN 115 course is offered in D block in first term, so you will not be able to choose Fall or Winter skills that are offered in D1/D2/D3 (“D block”).

 

Questions You Might Have

1. I am interested in Development Studies. Why is it not listed in the Arts Subjects above?
The introductory courses for Development Studies are second-year courses and students are required to have completed 24 credits of university study prior to registration in those courses. (A new 3-credit first-year course has been added to the curriculum but is not being offered this year.)  Click on the Development Studies subject link on the “Academic Subjects” page to explore this option. If you are interested in these courses, you can look forward to taking them in second year or later.

2. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our other professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Business Administration; Engineering; Human Nutrition; Nursing. (Human Kinetics also falls into this category.)  These subjects cannot be used as pairs or as "arts/science" or approved electives.  They are not considered arts or science courses, so cannot be used to fulfill any of your first-year requirements.

Courses in these departments are normally restricted to students in these programs (with the exception of introductory courses in Business Administration, one course in Human Nutrition, and two upper-level elective courses in Nursing). If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these programs in a future year you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but such permission is not routinely granted.

Should you be permitted to take any of these courses in the future, you will be permitted a maximum of 6 credits and will have to use those credits in the “open elective” slot of your degree pattern.  If this is of interest to you, you are strongly advised not to consider doing so until later in your program.  If you still want to explore the option of taking courses from these departments in first year, you should speak with the Human Kinetics chair or an academic advisor to discuss the implications to your overall program.

3. The Academic Calendar refers to “Arts X”, “Arts Y”, “Science A” and “Science B”. What do these mean?
“Science A” and “Science B” are terms that are normally used only in the stream in which a student does a minor in one science subject. Science A is your minor, in which you will have to complete a total of 24 credits over the duration of your degree. Science B is your second science, in which you are required to complete 6 credits; that requirement will normally be met by the end of first year.

“Arts X” and “Arts Y” are terms used in all Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics streams. As mentioned above, you are required to complete a “pair” in one arts subject. This is your Arts X. In addition, you are required to complete 6 credits in a second arts subject. This is your Arts Y. At the end of first year, one of your arts subjects will be usable as your Arts Y, and that requirement will be complete.

Arts X and Y must be from different departments. Therefore, you may not do Arts X in one language and Arts Y in a second language (because all French, German and Spanish courses are offered by the Department of Modern Languages). That is why it is not advisable for first-year students in your program to take two different language courses. (As an exception to this, a Celtic language course or a Latin course, CLAS 110, may be taken in addition to one of the three languages offered by Modern Languages because Celtic courses and Classical Studies courses are offered by different departments.)

4. What if I am interested in an honours degree?
Course selection is no different for first year. You may wish to check table 7.1.5 in the Academic Calendar for grade and average requirements, so that you are aware of the grades you will need for admission to this program at the end of second year.

5. Is it true that I can complete a Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition in one year after completing my Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics with the Nutrition Minor stream?
Yes. With careful course planning, you most certainly can. The Human Kinetics and the Human Nutrition sections of the Academic Calendar each outline the courses needed to complete these two degrees in five years. You may also want to meet with the Human Kinetics department chair or with an academic advisor if you have questions.

If you think you might be interested in this option, you should choose one of your arts courses from the humanities (Art, Catholic Studies, Celtic Studies, Classical Studies, English, French, German, History, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Spanish) and one from the social sciences (Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies) this year. The BSc in Human Nutrition requires at least 6 credits in one humanities subject and at least 6 credits in one social sciences subject, so this would ensure that your arts courses are in line with the arts requirements for the Human Nutrition degree.

6. I want to do a Bachelor of Education degree after I complete my Human Kinetics degree. Are there any particular courses that I should be taking?
This answer will be given in the context of the StFX B.Ed. program. You should understand that each university to which you might want to apply could have slightly different admission requirements, and you should do some research on each university in which you might be interested. Overall, the admission requirements will be similar in many ways, but there will definitely be differences, and you’ll want to try to incorporate those different requirements into your HKIN degree.

At StFX, as at other universities, there are two basic streams of study in the B.Ed. program: elementary and secondary. The full explanations of these programs are found in the Academic Calendar, section 6. If you are interested in the B.Ed. program, you are strongly advised to read that section and to attend information sessions offered by the Faculty of Education (normally in October). The earlier you make yourself aware of the requirements for that program, the easier it will be to tailor your HKIN degree to fulfill the necessary requirements. The Faculty of Education loves to see first-year students attend those sessions!

Following is a summary of section 6.1.3 and 6.1.4, with information as it pertains directly to courses offered at StFX.

 
For the elementary stream, there are five basic requirements:

(i) 9 credits of social studies from any one or any combination of the following disciplines: history, economics, political science, anthropology, sociology and/or philosophy. The introductory courses in any of these subjects will fulfill 6 of these 9 credits.
(ii) 6 credits of mathematics. The most common choice is MATH 101 and 102. One alternative is 6 credits of calculus (MATH 111 and 112).  A third option is any 6 credits from MATH 101, 102, 111, 205; or any one of these 3-credit courses plus 3 credits of statistics.
(iii) 6 credits of English. ENGL 100, or ENGL 111 and 112, will fulfill this requirement.
(iv) 6 credits of science. You will have plenty of science courses completed by the end of your degree.
(v) 3 or 6 credits of developmental psychology. You will need to take PSYC 100 before being permitted to take the 6-credit PSYC 260 - Developmental Psychology or the 3-credit PSYC 354 - Lifespan Developmental Psychology for the Health Sciences I:  Childhood and Adolescence.

So if you’re interested in the elementary stream of the B.Ed., it would be wise for you to take two of the following three arts options this year: ENGL 111 and 112 (or ENGL 100); 6 credits of “social studies” (as defined above); PSYC 100. If you are intending a minor in mathematics or physics in your human kinetics degree, you will be taking your math requirement this year, as well. You can take any remaining requirements in later years.

 
For the secondary stream, there are two basic requirements:

(i) “Major Subject Field”: A minimum of 30 credits of university coursework in one discipline of a subject taught in Nova Scotia secondary schools. For you, this will be “Physical Education”, and your 54 credits of HKIN courses will more than satisfy this requirement.
(ii) “Minor Subject Field”: A minimum of 18 credits of university coursework in one discipline of a second subject taught in Nova Scotia secondary schools. Allowable subject fields are English; French; Social Studies (all 18 credits must be in one of the related disciplines: economics, history, political science, sociology or anthropology);  Mathematics;  Science (all 18 credits must be in one of the related disciplines: biology, chemistry, earth sciences or physics); Gaelic; Fine Arts (studio art or music); Family Studies (which is not possible within the framework of the HKIN degrees); Spanish.

If you’re interested in the secondary stream of the B.Ed., you should think about which of the “Minor Subject Field” options you would want to choose. As a student in the BSc in Human Kinetics, you would need to choose mathematics or one of the other sciences. Ultimately, the minor you choose for your BSC HKIN degree will be your “Minor Subject Field” in a B.Ed. program. You will be following the “minor in one science” stream if you intend to pursue an education degree.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Science
in Human Nutrition!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Science in Human Nutrition is very easy. There are some required courses, and you have a variety of choice in the selection of your two elective arts subjects.

 
First-Year Course Pattern
BIOL 111 – Introductory Cell Biology - 3 credits (first term)
HNU 145 – Introduction to Foods - 3 credits (second term)
HNU 161 – Food and Nutrition for Health in Society - 3 credits (first term)
HNU 235 – Communications - 3 credits (second term)
CHEM 100 – General Chemistry - 6 credits (full year)
Humanities elective - 6 credits in one subject
Social Sciences elective - 6 credits in one subject
 

Arts Requirements
You will choose courses in two arts subjects. One of these subjects should be from the humanities and the other should be from the social sciences. Your degree will require you to have at least 6 credits in one humanities subject and at least 6 credits in one social sciences subject, so it would be wise to register in appropriate courses to fulfill those requirements in first year. Your chosen 12 credits of arts will complete your 30 credits for the year.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

 Humanities Social Sciences
 Art (Art History & Studio Art)  Anthropology
 Catholic Studies  Development Studies *
 Celtic Studies  Economics
 Classical Studies  Political Science
 English  Psychology
 French  Public Policy and Governance
 German  Sociology
 History  Women's & Gender Studies
 Mi’kmaq  
 Music  
 Philosophy  
 Religious Studies  
 Spanish  

*Development Studies is not an available option for first-year students. Those who are interested in this subject should explore this option and can look forward to taking such courses in third and/or fourth year.

Take the opportunity to explore subjects that are new to you as you contemplate your options for arts courses. Note that some first-year courses in the Faculty of Arts are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.

When you choose your arts subjects, remember that you will ultimately be required to complete a total of 12 credits in one arts subject (either a humanities or a social sciences subject) as part of your degree requirements. This requirement is called a “pair”. (For the full definition of a “pair”, please see the “Glossary of Terms”.) You may decide, as most students do, to complete your pair in one of the arts subjects that you take in first year. To accomplish this, you will complete a second 6 credits in that subject, normally in third year, or in fourth year if you prefer.

However, if you find at year-end that you are not interested in taking more courses in either of the arts subjects you took in first year, you will not be required to do so. You will be able to try a new arts subject in third year, and take the second 6 credits of that subject in fourth year to complete your pair requirement.

So you can explore your first-year arts options risk-free! Take courses that you know you’ll really like, or be adventurous and try something new!


Things to Remember

  • When building your course schedule, be sure to begin with required courses that are offered in only one timeblock, and schedule other courses around those.
  • When scheduling your arts courses, try to avoid the F block so that you can leave it free for Human Nutrition seminars that are held in that block throughout the year. (This reference to “F block” will become clearer as you navigate through this website and begin to build your course schedule.)


Question You Might Have

What if I want to take two humanities or two social sciences subjects this year?
It is certainly your prerogative to do so. Your overall degree pattern includes 9 – 15 credits of open electives (depending upon your choice of the regular or the honours program), so you could use one of your arts subjects this year as an open elective in your degree. However, you would need to remember to take 6 credits in an arts subject from the other category before the end of your program. You would do this in third or fourth year.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing is very simple. All but one course is required and your registration in those required courses will be done for you.  You will only need to choose and register for one elective course.
 
 
First-Term Courses
CHEM 151 – Fundamentals of General Organic, Biological Chemistry - 3 credits
BIOL 251 – Human Anatomy and Physiology I - 3 credits
ENGL 111 – Literature and Academic Writing I - 3 credits
PSYC 155  Introduction to Psychology for Nurses - 3 credits
STAT 101 (H)  Introductory Statistics - 3 credits
 
 
Second-Term Courses
BIOL 115 – Microbes in Human Biology - 3 credits
BIOL 252  Human Anatomy and Physiology II - 3 credits
HNU 135 – Introductory Nutrition for Nursing - 3 credits
PHIL 135 – Healthcare Ethics:  Theories, Values, & Practice - 3 credits
Social Sciences or Humanities (arts) elective - 3 credits (could possibly be moved to first term; see below)

 

Social Sciences and Humanities (Arts) Electives

A list of allowable options for your social sciences or humanities elective is below.  These are the Faculty of Arts subjects that offer 3-credit introductory courses.  You may choose any 100-level course from these arts subjects that will fit your schedule.

Arts Subjects  
Anthropology History
Art (Art History and Studio Art) Mi’kmaq
Catholic Studies Music
Celtic Studies Political Science
Development Studies Public Policy and Governance
Economics Religious Studies
English Sociology
French Spanish
German  

 

 

Other Important Information

During the month of June you will receive a comprehensive information package from the School of Nursing. This package will include a short program overview and a list of a number of forms that you must have completed (immunization forms, First Aid certificate, WHMIS, etc.).

Also note that there will be group meetings in the fall and winter terms to help orientate you to the School of Nursing.

Be aware that the Bachelor of Science in Nursing has several additional financial costs that are not present in other degree programs.  Please see the "Costs" paragraph in section 9.28 of the Academic Calendar for more details.

Finally...feel free to browse through the "Academic Subjects" pages.  They will provide more information about the courses in which you will be registered in the coming year.

 

Question You Might Have

Is it possible to take a first-term course rather than a second-term course as my arts elective?
If you are more drawn to a first-term course for your elective, you might be able to change your STAT 101 to second term, subject to availability, and if an available section will fit your schedule.  You will need an override to do this, as the second-term STAT 101 sections are normally restricted to students in business and arts.  You should also be aware that although the courses teach the same material, the examples used in the first-term sections are health science-based while those used in the second-term sections are more business-oriented.  Also be prepared that the second-term sections might be full, so this may not be an option for you.
 
Before dropping the first-term Statistics course, be sure that there is a seat available in the second-term course, that you can obtain an override for it, and that the first-term elective you want to take fits your schedule and has availability.  To determine course availability, use the "Class Search" option in Banner. 

 

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Science!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Science offers a lot of options. Whether you know exactly what you want to study in first year, or you are looking for ideas and want to explore new subjects, the BSc program can accommodate you.

There are only two required courses for the Bachelor of Science degree programs. All students must complete Calculus I and II - MATH 106/107 or MATH 126/127.  Both sets of calculus courses cover the same material, use the same textbook, and have the same common final exam. The difference between the two is the number of hours of class time each week.  See Question 1 below, or the course descriptions in the Academic Calendar, for guidance on the appropriate course choice for you.

Beyond Calculus, there is a basic first-year course pattern to consider, and there are a few things to remember when choosing your courses, but you have a lot of options from which to choose.

When choosing courses, remember that most science courses have accompanying labs. These labs are required components of the courses, and take up additional time in your course schedule. First-year Earth Sciences courses are exceptions; ESCI 171 and 172 do not have labs, but they do have one-hour tutorials.

Note that some first-year courses in the sciences and the arts are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.

 

First-Year Course Patterns
In first-year BSc, there are two basic course patterns from which students will choose.

Option 1 is the most common pattern. Your 30 credits will look like this:
      MATH 106 or 126 – Calculus I – 3 credits (first term)
      MATH 107 or 127 – Calculus II – 3 credits (second term)
      Science courses – 12 credits (6 credits in each of two science subjects)
      Arts courses – 12 credits (normally 6 credits in each of two arts subjects)

Option 2 will result in your 30 credits looking like this:
      MATH 106 or 126 – Calculus I – 3 credits (first term)
      MATH 107 or 127 – Calculus II – 3 credits (second term)
      Science courses – 18 credits (6 credits in each of three science subjects)
      Arts course(s) – normally 6 credits in one arts subject

With the three sciences in Option 2, you may have either two or three laboratory courses. If Earth Sciences is one of your chosen science subjects, for example, you will have only two lab courses this year. If you choose biology, chemistry, and physics, you will have three lab courses. Three lab courses in first year should be attempted only by those students with a superior high school record (recommended minimum average of 85).

 
Science Courses
Your choice of science courses will depend upon your intended major. If you are as yet unsure what that will be, choose courses that will allow you the flexibility to choose among your options at a later date. For a full list of science subjects, and links to the relevant subject pages, see below.

Biology: You will choose BIOL 111 and 112 (3 credits each) and CHEM 100 (full-year, 6-credit course). If you want a third science, you may choose from physics, Earth sciences or computer science. If you intend an honours degree in biology, note that PHYS 101 and 102, (or 121 and 122 if you would prefer) will be required at some point in your program, though not necessarily in first year.
Chemistry: You will choose CHEM 120. PHYS 121 and 122 is the best option for your second science, as these are required courses for chemistry majors and must be completed before the end of second year.  However, if you would prefer to take biology or Earth sciences in first year, and take PHYS 121 and 122 in second year instead, you may do so.
Computer Science: You will choose CSCI 161 and 162, and 6 credits of introductory course(s) in any one of the other sciences.
Earth Sciences: You will choose ESCI 171 and 172 and either CHEM 100 or 120.  It is recommended that you take a third science. If you intend the geochemistry concentration, you should take either PHYS 101 and 102 or PHYS 121 and 122. If you plan the environmental science concentration or the geoscience concentration, PHYS 101/102 or 121/122, or BIOL 111 and 112, are the options from which you should choose.
Environmental Sciences: If you are intending the biology concentration, the chemistry concentration, or the biogeochemistry concentration, you will choose BIOL 111 and 112; ESCI 171 and 172; CHEM 100 or 120 (100 for biology; 120 for chemistry; either one for biogeochemistry). If you are intending the climate and water concentration, you will choose CHEM 100 or 120; ESCI 171 and 172; PHYS 121 and 122. This program is very prescribed. In order to complete all requirements within four years, you will need to take the three sciences in first year.
Mathematics: You are already taking MATH 106/107 or 126/127, which are the foundational courses for students intending mathematics as the major subject of study. For your two sciences this year, you may choose from biology, chemistry, Earth sciences or physics. You may also choose computer science, in place of one of these two sciences, or as a third science. If you plan to do an advanced major or honours in mathematics, you will eventually need to take CSCI 161 because it is a required course for those programs.  CSCI 162 is also recommended (though not required), so you may wish to take these courses this year.
Physics: You will choose PHYS 121 and 122. Your second science should be CHEM 100 or 120 (normally 120). The other primary science subject for physics students is math. As you are already taking MATH 106/107 or 126/127 as part of your first-year course pattern, you will likely opt to take two arts courses rather than a third science, though you are permitted to take a third science if you wish, within the recommendations of “Option 2” above.
Psychology: You will choose PSYC 100 and BIOL 111 and 112. If you choose to take a third science, CHEM 100 or 120 (normally 100) is the standard choice. (Students who intend an advanced major or honours program in psychology will be required to take one of these introductory chemistry courses. The major program in psychology does not require chemistry.) Note: Psychology is considered a science only for students whose major subject is psychology. For all other students, psychology is an arts subject.
 

Arts Courses
If you are taking two arts courses this year, as most students do, you will normally choose 6 credits in each of two subjects below.  (Exceptions would include Development Studies and/or Public Policy and Governance; see Questions 2 and 3 below.)  Please note that it is not advisable in first year to take two different language courses from the Department of Modern Languages (French, German, Spanish); Question 4, below, explains why. 

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects  
 Anthropology  Mi’kmaq
 Art (Art History & Studio Art)  Music
 Catholic Studies  Philosophy
 Celtic Studies  Political Science
 Classical Studies  Psychology *
 Development Studies  Public Policy and Governance
 Economics  Religious Studies
 English  Sociology 
 French  Spanish
 German  Women's & Gender Studies
 History  

*Psychology is an arts subject for all students except those who choose to major in psychology, for whom it is considered a science.

When making your arts choices for this year, explore your options! You may decide to choose courses in subjects that are familiar to you, but don’t hesitate to be adventurous and try something new.

It is advisable to choose at least one subject in which you think you might be interested in taking an additional course or two in the future. All degree patterns in the Bachelor of Science require the completion of one 12-credit “pair”, plus 6 credits in a second arts subject.  (A “pair” is 12 credits in one arts subject – see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition.) If you really like one of your arts subjects this year, you can take an additional 6 credits in that subject over the remaining years of your program and complete your pair that way.

However, if you find at year-end that you are not interested in taking additional courses in either of your first-year arts subjects, don’t worry. You won’t have to. The courses will still be usable in your BSc degree pattern, and you can try a new subject the following year.

Whether or not you ultimately decide to pair one of the arts subjects that you choose for this year, be reassured that those courses will be usable in your BSc program. You can choose your arts courses this year risk-free!

 

Questions You Might Have

1.  How do I decide which set of calculus courses to take?
 
MATH 126 and 127 have the usual 3 contact hours per week with the instructor, and an additional one-hour lab every other week. This stream offers calculus at the traditional pace, and is designed for students who have a strong pre-calculus (or high school calculus) background, and who would prefer a faster pace.
 
MATH 106 and 107 have 4 contact hours per week with the instructor, and an additional one-hour lab/tutorial per week.  The extra time allows for a slower pace, more in-class examples, and problem sessions with the instructor to provide additional time for guided practice. The courses are designed for those students who may have a weaker pre-calculus foundation, or who may benefit from the extra time and slower pace.
 
2. I am interested in Development Studies, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in DEVS, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of DEVS, to include DEVS 201 and 202, over the remaining years of your degree. If you decide to do a minor in Development Studies (see Question 8 below), you should complete DEVS 201 and 202 in second year, plus an additional 15 credits of DEVS over the remaining years of your degree.

3. I am interested in Public Policy and Governance, but there is only one 3-credit course available at the 100-level. What else should I take in the second semester to fill out my schedule?
You can take any other 3-credit course from the arts subjects listed above, as long as there is no first-term prerequisite for the course. If you decide to do a pair (see explanation above) in PGOV, you will need to complete 9 additional credits of PGOV over the remaining years of your degree. If you decide to do a minor in Public Policy and Governance (see Question 8 below), you will need to complete either ECON 101 or 102 as part of that minor, so you may wish to take ECON 102 in second term if that course is not already in your plan for first year.

4. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. Most courses in these departments are restricted to students in these programs. There are a couple of exceptions, however. BSAD 101 and 102 are available to non-business students, if there are seats available after registration has concluded for first-year students, but these courses are only usable as open electives in the BSc program (except in the BSc with Advanced Major in a Science with Business Administration, in which they are required courses, though often taken in second year). There are also a 200-level Human Nutrition course and two 300-level Nursing elective courses that are open to upper-year students outside of those programs. If you are interested in taking other courses from one of these departments you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but such permission is not routinely granted.

5. The Academic Calendar refers to “Science A”, “Science B” and “Science C”. What do these mean?
“Science A” is your major (or advanced major or honours) subject. It is your primary area of study.

“Science B” is a second science in which you will need to complete a total of 12 credits (with 6 credits above the 100-level). Normally, you will take 6 credits of 100-level “Science B” courses in your first year. (For students planning a joint advanced major or joint honours degree, Science B is the secondary subject of study.)

“Science C” is a third science in which you will need to complete a total of 6 credits.

One of your three required science subjects (Science A, Science B, Science C) must be from the department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, and must include MATH 106 or 126, and 107 or 127. (Students who do not major in mathematics or computer science will require Science B or Science C to be mathematics.)

6. The Academic Calendar refers to “Arts X” and “Arts Y”. What do these mean?
“Arts X” is a pair (see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition) and “Arts Y” is 6 credits in a second arts subject.

Arts X and Y must be from different departments. For example, you may not do Arts X in French and Arts Y in German (because all French, German and Spanish courses are offered by the Department of Modern Languages). For this reason, it is not advisable for first-year students in your program to take two different language courses. (As an exception to this, a Celtic language course or a Latin course, CLAS 110, may be taken in addition to one of the three languages offered by Modern Languages because Celtic Studies courses and Classical Studies courses are offered by different departments.)

7. What if I am interested in an honours or an advanced major degree?
Course selection is no different for first year. You may wish to check table 7.1.5 in your Academic Calendar for grade and average requirements, so that you are aware of the grades you will need for admission to these programs at the end of second year.

8. Can I do a minor in my Bachelor of Science degree?
The BSc with Major degree program does allow an optional minor.  Students may opt to do a minor in a science subject or in an arts subject.  Minors are not available in Business Administration or in any of the professional / applied sciences (Aquatic Resources, Engineering, Health, Human Kinetics, Human Nutrition, or Nursing).

At present, the advanced major and honours degree programs do not have an option for a minor.

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Diploma in Engineering!

First-year course selection for the Diploma in Engineering is very simple, as most courses are required, and you need to choose only one elective course.  In addition, you will be registered for all of your required courses, and will need to register yourself only in your chosen writing elective.

 

First-Year Course Pattern

CHEM 120 – Principles of Chemistry (full year)

ENGR 121 – Calculus I for Engineers (first term)
ENGR 122 – Calculus II for Engineers (second term)
ENGR 131 – Engineering Graphics and Fundamentals (first term)
ENGR 132 – Engineering Communications I (second term)
ENGR 136 – Statics (second term)
ENGR 198 – ST: Programming-based Design (first term)

PHYS 121 – Physics for the Physical Sciences and Engineering I (first term)
PHYS 122 – Physics for the Physical Sciences and Engineering II (second term)

Writing course(s) - 6 credits from the subjects listed below (full year)

 

In total, you will be taking 6 courses each term.

  

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following table are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Writing Courses

 
Anthropology Philosophy
Art (Art History only) Political Science
Celtic Studies (literature or culture) Religious Studies
English Sociology
History  

 

Things to Remember

  • Some of the writing course options are full-year, 6-credit courses.  However, most are one-semester, 3-credit courses.  You are permitted to take either one 6-credit course, or two 3-credit courses in the same or in different subjects.  The choice is yours, and is only dependent on what will fit into your schedule.
  • If you wish to take a writing course from a subject other than those listed above, you must first obtain approval from the chair of the Department of Engineering.

 

Question You Might Have

What if I want to complete my diploma over three years, rather than two years?
It is certainly your prerogative to complete your program in this way.  You should meet with the department chair or with an academic advisor to discuss your program plan.  At the very least, you should ensure that you choose CHEM 120, PHYS 121 and 122, and ENGR 121, 122 and 136 for your first year.  Additional course choices will depend upon the number of credits you wish to take in first year, and your overall diploma completion plan.

 

 

 

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

Welcome to the Bachelor of Arts in Music (Jazz Studies) and the Diploma in Jazz Studies!

First-year course selection for the Bachelor of Arts in Music (Jazz Studies) and the Diploma in Jazz Studies is identical, and very simple. Most of the courses are required music courses, and there is only one elective course that you will need to choose.

One of the courses in your program (MUSI 190) is a 6-credit, full-year course.  The remaining courses are 3 credits each and are either offered in one semester, or are offered over the full year.

 

First-Year Course Pattern
MUSI 101 – Structure of Music I
MUSI 103 – Jazz Theory I
MUSI 106 – Vocal Ensemble I
     or MUSI 107 – Instrumental Ensembles I
MUSI 117 – History of Popular Music
MUSI 118 – World Music
MUSI 165 – Jazz Styles and Literature
MUSI 190 – Applied Performance I (full year)
Arts or Science course(s) – 6 credits, normally in one subject (full year)
 

 
Arts/Science Requirement
In addition to your required MUSI courses, which total 24 credits, you will choose 6 credits in an arts or science subject.

Note that some first-year arts and science courses are full-year, 6-credit courses. Other departments, however, have two 3-credit courses (one each term) that together provide 6 credits of introductory study in that subject.

Please note that the subjects displayed in the following tables are also links to their respective pages on this website.  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of the applicable subject page.

Arts Subjects  
Anthropology History
Art (Art History and Studio Art) Mathematics (& Statistics) *
Catholic Studies Mi’kmaq
Celtic Studies Philosophy
Classical Studies Political Science
Computer Science * Psychology
Development Studies Public Policy and Governance
Economics Religious Studies
English Sociology
French Spanish
German Women’s and Gender Studies

* Mathematics, Statistics & Computer Science is a department in the Faculty of Science, but for purposes of pairs (see definition below) and electives in the music programs, courses in this department are considered as arts courses.

 

Science Subjects
Biology
Chemistry
Earth Sciences
Physics

 

When making your choice, you need to be aware of some important notes regarding the way in which these elective credits will be used in your degree pattern:

  • All of the degree programs in music require the completion of at least two "pairs".  A pair is essentially 12 credits in one subject (see the Glossary of Terms for a full definition).  Therefore, it is advisable in first year to choose a subject in which you think you might be interested in taking another course or two in the future.  If you enjoy your first-year elective enough to take additional credits in the same subject, you will then need to take 6 additional credits in that subject in a future year to complete one pair.
  • However, the music degree programs also require open electives.  So if you find, at year end, that you'd really rather not take any additional courses in your first-year elective subject, you won't have to.  You will be able to use that first-year course as 6 credits of open electives, and try a new arts or science subject in second year with which to attempt to begin fulfilling your pair requirements.
  • Most students choose a subject from the arts, but a science subject is an allowable option for you. If you choose a science, however, be aware that only one of your pairs may be in a science subject. All other required pairs, which you will complete over the remaining three years of your program, must be in arts subjects.
  • If you have been accepted to the Diploma in Jazz Studies, you may take any arts or science elective that is open to first-year students. You may also take 3 credits from one subject and 3 credits from a second subject, if you wish. There is no pair requirement in the diploma program.

 

Notes Regarding Science Courses

  • Although music students are permitted to take science courses, some of the science subjects may be more readily accessible than others during your initial registration.
  • If you are interested in Earth Sciences, the introductory courses are definitely open to you, and you are very welcome to take them. (Note that the introductory Earth Sciences courses do not have labs, though they do have bi-weekly two-hour tutorials.)
  • Physics is also an option and there are usually seats available for non-science students. (Note that in addition to the "normal" introductory physics courses, the department offers two first-year astronomy courses, PHYS 171 and 172, that were developed for non-science students. These courses cannot be used as part of a pair, so are not recommended for first-year music students. In the music programs, they can be used as arts/science electives only; if you are interested in these courses, it is recommended that you take them in a later year, after your pairs have been established. These courses are not options for you if you intend the Bachelor of Music (Jazz Studies) with Honours degree.) Students interested in completing a physics pair should take PHYS 100 or 120.
  • Biology and chemistry may be restricted to science students until all have registered. You may be able to register for CHEM 100 or 120 or for BIOL 111 and 112 when you register for your other courses.  However, if you try to do so and receive a "College Restriction" error message, contact the relevant department chair to request to be added to a waiting list.  Usually, non-science students are ultimately able to register in these courses, but sometimes not until later in the summer.  In the meantime, be sure to choose and register in a different course, in case you are not able to get a seat in the science course that you want.

 

Things to Remember

  • Take the opportunity to explore subjects that are new to you as you contemplate your options for your arts/science elective subject. You do need to choose carefully, as discussed above, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t be adventurous and try something new!
  • Though the following tips may sound a little confusing at the moment, they will become clearer to you as you move along the process, and actually begin to build your schedule. You can always refer back to this page later.
  • When building your course schedule, be sure to begin with your required music courses, which are offered in only one timeblock, and schedule your elective course(s) around those. (This reference to “timeblock” will also become clearer as you navigate through this website.)
  • If you are a vocalist, and therefore taking MUSI 106, be sure to register for section 11 (not section 12). Section 11 is for students in the music program; section 12 is for non-music students.
  • When scheduling your elective subject, you will need to avoid choosing a course that meets between 3:45 and 5:00, Monday through Thursday. This translates to blocks HJ/JH and T1/T2. All music students need to leave these blocks open for “Combo Time” (when combo rehearsals are held) and for improvisation classes and master classes with visiting artists.
  • In addition to the above timeblocks, which all music students must leave free, you will need to avoid other blocks, depending upon your instrument. Rhythm section players (guitar, piano, bass and drums) must avoid the GH block, as the Rhythm Section Master Class meets weekly on Mondays from 2:15 – 3:30. In addition, drum students must avoid courses on Wednesdays from 7:00 – 9:00 pm in the fall term (impacting on blocks N3 and N7) and on Mondays from 6:00 – 8:00 pm in the winter term (which impacts on blocks R1, S1, N1, N5 and V1). These are the times of the Percussion Ensemble rehearsals.
  • Vocalists must avoid scheduling courses between 9:45 and 11:00 on Tuesday mornings, as this time is reserved for Vocal master class. This translates to block LA (or A2 and L1 blocks).

 

Other Important Information

  • All students should plan to be on campus a few days before the beginning of the fall term in order to get settled; to meet with their respective studio teachers to schedule lessons; and to take ensemble placement auditions.
  • There will be a General Music Department Meeting scheduled during the first week. This will inform students about departmental policies and practices. The time and place of the meeting will be posted in Gilmora Hall – the Music Building – during the first week of the term. All students are to attend.
  • The time and place of ensemble placement auditions will be posted in Gilmora Hall. These auditions include reading, improvisation, and repertoire components. All students must audition for their placement in ensembles.

 

Questions You Might Have
1. I am interested in Development Studies. Why is that subject not listed in the allowable first-year subjects?
The introductory courses for Development Studies are second-year courses and students are required to have completed 24 credits of university study prior to registration in those courses.  If you are interested in these courses you can look forward to taking them in second year or later.  Development Studies courses may be used as arts electives, or as a pair subject.

2. What if I am interested in taking a course in a subject that is not mentioned above?
The other subjects offered at StFX are in our professional or applied programs: Aquatic Resources; Business Administration; Engineering; Health; Human Kinetics; Human Nutrition; Nursing. These courses are not considered arts or science courses, so cannot be used to fulfill your pair requirements, but any courses taken from these programs may be used in partial fulfillment of your other elective credits. Most courses in these departments are restricted to students in these programs. There are a couple of exceptions, however. BSAD 101 and 102 are available to non-business students, if there are seats available after registration has concluded for first-year students, but these courses are only usable as open electives in the Music programs, and are not usable at all in the Diploma in Jazz Studies. There are also a 200-level Human Nutrition course and two 300-level Nursing elective courses that are open to students outside of those programs. If you are interested in taking other courses from these departments you will need to contact the relevant department chair, but such permission is not routinely granted.

Because of the limited number of open electives in the Music programs, and because your program requires you to take courses from the arts and sciences, you are strongly advised not to consider taking courses from any of these applied program departments in first year.

 

get Started  Step 3 - Build Your Course Schedule  

 How to build a conflict-free schedule

In the previous step you determined the courses in which you want to register. You are now  ready to build your personal course schedule. You are encouraged to do this well in advance of your registration start  time. This will allow you to complete your registration much more quickly and give you the best chance of getting into the courses and sections of courses that you want.

Some Basics about Course Scheduling:
  • The on-line Course Timetable lists the courses which have been scheduled for this academic year. 
  • Some courses are 6-credit, full year courses (September to April) and some are 3-credit courses offered in the first term or the second term.
  • All courses have 150 minutes of classes per week, some in two 75-minute timeblocks some in three 50-minute timeblocks, and a few in one 150-minute timeblock.
  • You will register in all of your courses for this academic year: first term, second term and full-year courses.
  • Some courses have two or more sections. Sections are unique instances of courses that are identical except that they may be offered in different timeblocks and often with a different professor. You can choose whichever section will fit your schedule.
  • The section of a course is denoted by two digits following the colon after the course number, and each section of a course also has a unique course reference number or CRN.
  • Some courses have lectures and labs associated with them. If a course has a lab section you MUST register in it as well as in the lecture section at the same time. If you forget to include a lab section when you try to register for the lecture section, you will get a Co-Requisite Error and will not be enrolled in the course.
  • Click here to view a sample section of a course timetable with a description of the various fields.
OK, let's start to map out your class schedule.

Your objective is to find sections of courses that fit into your schedule and do not conflict with the sections of the other courses in which you want to register.  Here's how...

  1. Use the timetable blocks for each term to build your schedule. These are included in your Registration Toolkit.
     
  2. Check the Course Timetable to determine when each of your desired courses is offered
    • Start with those courses which are most important to you

    • On the Course Timetable (second tab in Step 3), click on the appropriate academic subject for each of your desired courses. 

    • Take note of the timeblocks associated with the particular section of the course in which you wish to register and check it against your worksheet  to make sure it will not conflict with any other courses you may have already selected. If the course has a lab component, do the same to ensure that both the lecture and lab sections fit.

    • You need to do this for both First and Second terms (and remember to write full year courses on both term worksheets).

  3. Once you find a section that fits, enter the subject, course number, section number and CRN into the applicable timeblocks on your worksheet. Repeat this step for any other course in that subject in which you want to register. 
  4. Once you've finished with a subject, close its tab or window and select the next subject.

  5. Continue this process until you have built your schedule to accomodate all of the courses you want.  You will normally register in 30 credits of courses for the year.
  OK...now you should be ready to register in your selected courses.  You are almost done!
 

get Started  Step 4 - Register for your Courses  

Register for Your Courses

So far, you've learned about the course requirements for your program, you've explored the academic subjects that will satisfy those requirements and you've selected the courses that will provide you with a conflict-free schedule.  Now it's time to learn about how to register in your courses.

First, let's go through the web registration tutorial.

Here are a few registration tips.

To contact department chairs regarding registration error overrides, refer to this department contact list.

Using these buttons, log into Banner Self-Service to register in courses and log into mesAMIS to view/print your course schedule.

 

get Started  Step 5 - After You Register  

What's Next

 
Congratulations on completing the registration steps. Remember that you can make adjustments to your registration (add or drop courses or change sections of courses) until the end of the first week of classes in September, subject to course availability. You will also have the opportunity to meet with an advisor, if you wish, when you arrive on campus in September.

Now, get ready for Orientation Week...

The University, together with the Students' Union, is working to present an orientation experience that is informative, inclusive and fun. A team of students and staff are working hard over the summer to plan events that get you acquainted with new friends, the campus, and the surrounding Antigonish and County community.

Events Start on Saturday, September 5th, and run throughout the week.

Learn about the Xaverian Welcome Ceremony.

Check out the StFX Students' Union website for more Orientation Week information.

International Students Welcome program begins Tuesday, September 1st . If you are planning to attend International Students Welcome, you will soon be able to find the full welcome program schedule here.

Academic Subjects

Note:  If first-year, 100-level courses are offered in a particular subject, their course descriptions are displayed at the bottom of that subject's webpage.  Also included are the course descriptions for those 200-level courses that are required first-year courses in some programs.

Arts

Anthropology
Art
Catholic Studies
Celtic Studies
Classical Studies
Development Studies
Economics
English
French
German
Health
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
Mi’kmaq
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Public Policy and Governance
Religious Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Women's & Gender Studies

 

Science

Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Earth Sciences
Environmental Sciences
Health
Mathematics and Statistics
Physics

  

Professional/Applied

Aquatic Resources
Business Administration
Engineering
Human Kinetics
Human Nutrition
Nursing

 

Academic Calendar (also known as the Calendar)
The university’s official publication which outlines admission requirements, fees, grading systems, academic regulations, course offerings, and other information. Students admitted in a particular year are bound by the regulations described in the Academic Calendar for that year.

Academic Year
The regular academic year at StFX runs from September to April. The first term lasts from early September to mid-December and the second term, from early January to late April. See also spring and summer sessions.

Advanced Standing
Students may enter a higher level of courses in a subject when they have mastered the lower, usually introductory, level. This is normally permitted after completion of international baccalaureate (IB) or advanced placement (AP) courses. See sections 1.3 h. and 1.3.i of the Academic Calendar. Advanced standing does not reduce the number of credits required for a degree.

Audit
Audit means to listen. A student may attend a course without working toward or expecting to earn credits for the course. Only courses without a laboratory or hands-on component may be audited. Fees for a course taken for audit are normally one-half of the usual fee.

Bachelor’s or Baccalaureate Degree
The degree usually awarded after three or four years of study and successful completion of course and program requirements. A bachelor’s degree may be awarded in arts (BA), science (B.Sc.), business administration (BBA), education (B.Ed.) or information systems (BIS); some may be earned with honours, with advanced major, or with major. See page 3 of the Academic Calendar for more information on bachelor’s degrees at StFX.

Banner Self-Service
This is the name of the self service web application which is used by students to register in courses and to obtain their T2202A tax forms. Students log into Banner Self-Service using their ID number and their secure PIN.

Bursary
A monetary award based on financial need and reasonable academic standing.

CRN
This is the abbreviation for Course Registration Number. Each section of a course has a unique CRN which can be used to register for that class in Banner Self Service.

Chair
The head of an academic department, for example, the chair of the Department of Celtic Studies.

Concentration
A tertiary subject or area of study, normally at least 18 credits in one subject.

Convocation
The graduation ceremony held every spring and fall at which degrees and diplomas are awarded.

Course Level
Courses are numbered and referred to according to the normal year of study in which a student would complete them,  as in 100-level (first year), 200-level (second year), 300-level (third year) and 400-level (fourth year) courses.

Credit
The value assigned to a course. A course with three or more contact hours per week for the academic year has a value of six credits and is called a full course. A course taught for three hours a week for one term has a value of three credits and is called a half course. When students successfully complete a course, they are said to have credit for the course.

Dean
At StFX, there are four deans: The Dean of Arts, the Dean of Business, the Dean of Education and the Dean of Science.

Dean’s List
An academic honour granted to students who achieve high grades while enrolled in 30 credits. See section 3.19 of the Academic Calendar.

Decile
The student decile ranking in a course (10 high, 1 low) recorded for courses with 15 or more registrants.

Diploma
An earned document which follows a program of study typically lasting two years or less.

Distinction
A designation awarded to students whose general average over their final three years of study is 80 or higher. Minimum averages each year may also apply. See section 3.20 of the Academic Calendar.

Electives
Courses which are not specified in a degree program. Electives may be open, that is, chosen by the student, or approved. Approved electives require permission from either the chair of the department of the student’s major, or the chair of the department in which the student wishes to take a course. "Arts/Science" electives cannot be from the professional or applied program departments of aquatic resources, business administration, engineering, information systems, human kinetics, human nutrition or nursing.

Faculty
A grouping of departments which give academic instruction in related subjects. At StFX, there are four faculties: the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Business, the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Science. The Faculty of Arts is comprised of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. Within the Faculty of Business are the business administration and information systems subjects. The Faculty of Education includes education courses at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral level. The Faculty of Science contains the life, earth and physical sciences, as well as engineering, human kinetics, human nutrition, nursing and mathematics, statistics, and computer science. The term faculty is also used to describe members of the teaching staff of the university.

Full Time/Part Time
There are several definitions of full time/part time. Normally a student carries 30 credits for an academic year. Only students carrying at least 30 credits are considered for in-course scholarships. For the purpose of billing students, the business office considers a student carrying 24 or more credits to be full time. For the purpose of student loans 18 to 24 credits, or 60 percent to 80 percent of the normal load, may be considered full time by agencies which administer loan programs. For purposes of reporting to Statistics Canada full time is defined as 18 credits or more.

Grade Appeal
The process by which a student appeals his or her final grade for a course. See section 3.13 of the Academic Calendar.

Graduate Degree
Master’s or doctoral (Ph.D.) degrees require completion of an undergraduate degree first.

Honours
A degree which requires not only depth and breadth of subject study, but also superior academic achievement.

Humanities
The study of human thought which includes literature, philosophy, history, religion, languages, and the fine arts.

Invigilator
A person who, in the absence of the professor, administers and oversees examinations.

Junior
A third-year student.

Major
A student’s primary subject. StFX also offers joint major programs in some areas, allowing students to concentrate their studies in two subjects.

Mature Student
A candidate who has not fulfilled the normal admission requirements and has been out of school for at least three years.

MesAMIS
The name of the web application which students use to view their personal information such as grade reports, class and exam schedules and financial account information and also to submit web forms that are personalized with information from Banner. Some examples of these web forms are applications for late registration, course overload, registration error overrides, letters of permission and degree program change.

Minor
The secondary subject or area of study, normally at least 24 credits in one subject.

Non-Degree Student
A student who is not registered in a degree program but is enroled in courses either part time or full time.

Orientation
A program for new students providing an academic and social introduction to university life, held during the three days prior to the beginning of classes in September.

Pair
Twelve credits in one subject, with six credits at the 200-level or higher. As exceptions, language pairs in French, Celtic Studies and Classics may be composed of 12 credits at the 100-level. A student may complete only one pair from a department, and may not complete a pair in the major or minor subject. A pair may not be completed in any of the professional or applied program disciplines: AQUA, BSAD, ENGR, HKIN, HNU, INFO or NURS.

Passing Grade
The passing grade for all undergraduate courses is 50. See chapter 3 of the Academic Calendar. For education, see chapter 4. For graduate studies, see chapter 8.

Pattern
The recommended or suggested series of courses a student takes in order to fulfill degree requirements.

Placement Test
Incoming students who wish to study music or modern languages must take placement tests to determine their eligibility for, and appropriate level of, study. See department guidelines in chapter 9 of the Academic Calendar.

Plagiarism
A form of cheating in which a student attempts to pass off as his or her work the words or ideas of another person or another writer. See section 3.8 of the Academic Calendar.

Prerequisite
A course which must be completed before taking another course.

Program
An approved set of courses, requirements and study pattern, leading to a degree, diploma or certificate.

Rank
The student’s rank in his/her group and year of study. Ranking is not recorded for students enrolled in less than 18 credits or for those who withdraw during an academic year.

Registrar
The university officer responsible for managing academic information and processes and enforcing the regulations contained in the Academic Calendar as they pertain to students’ academic performance.

Registration
The process of formally enrolling in courses.

Repeated Course
When a student repeats a course, the original grade remains on the transcript and in the calculation of the student’s term average. However, if credits were orginally earned, they are removed from the student’s transcript.

Scholarship
A monetary award based on academic merit or excellence.

Section
Courses may have two or more sections. Sections are unique instances of courses that are identical except that they may be offered in different timeblocks and often with a different professor. The section of a course is denoted by two digits following the course number, and each section of a course also has a unique course reference number or CRN

Senior
A fourth-year student.

Service Learning
Service learning is an innovative way to integrate experiential learning, academic study and community service. It is an opportunity for students to apply what they are learning in the classroom in a community setting. The goal is to blend service and learning so that the service reinforces, improves and strengthens learning. Service learning is possible in many academic disciplines and through a broad range of courses and service experience.

Social Sciences
The systematic study of human behaviour, including anthropology, development studies, economics, political science, psychology, sociology and women’s and gender studies.

Sophomore
A second-year student.

Special Needs Student
A student with a physical or learning disability. See section 1.1 of the Academic Calendar.

Spring Session
An eight-week term from early May to late-June.

Student Loan
A sum of money which must be repaid. Loans to university students are obtained through the Canada Student Loan Plan.

Student Level
A student's level corresponds to the level of his/her degree program.  The most common student levels at StFX are UG (Undergraduate), ED (Bachelor of Education) and GR (Graduate).

Study Abroad
The opportunity for a student enrolled in a four-year program to study at another accredited university as part of a degree from StFX. See section 3.18 of the Academic Calendar.

Subject Abbreviations
The abbreviations below are used throughout the Calendar and on transcripts:
ADED Adult Education
ANTH Anthropology
AQUA Aquatic Resources
ART Art
BIOL Biology
BSAD Business Administration
CATH Catholic Studies
CELT Celtic Studies
CHEM Chemistry
CLAS Classical Studies
COML Comparative Literature
CSCI Computer Science
COOP Co-operative Education
DEVS Development Studies
ECON Economics
ESCI Earth Sciences
EDUC Education
ENGR Engineering
ENGL English
ENSC Environmental Sciences
FREN French
GERM German
HIST History
HKIN Human Kinetics
HNU Human Nutrition
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies
INFO Information Systems
MATH Mathematics
MIKM Mi’kmaq
MNST Ministry
MUSI Music
NURS Nursing
PHIL Philosophy
PHYS Physics
PSCI Political Science
PSYC Psychology
RELS Religious Studies
SOCI Sociology
SPAN Spanish
STAT Statistics
WMGS Women’s and Gender Studies

Subsidiary Subject
When the study of two subjects is combined such that one is subordinate to the other, the second is considered a subsidiary to the first. Within the BA Honours with a subsidiary program, the subjects in which an honours is possible are those in which one may complete a single honours, with the added exception of development studies. A subsidiary is possible in those fields in which one may complete at least a major with the added exception of art history.

Summer Session
A six-week term scheduled from early July to mid-August.

Thesis
The lengthy paper required for an honours or graduate degree.

Transcript
The record of a student’s program of study, courses taken, and grades achieved. See section 3.15 of the Academic Calendar for more information on academic records.

Transfer Credit
Courses taken at another university or college are given equivalent StFX course numbers and credit value for transfer credit.

Undergraduate Degree
A first degree completed at a university or college. At StFX, the first degree is the baccalaureate degree which takes four years of full-time study to complete.

Year of Study
Most four-year degree programs require the completion of 120 credits, normally at 30 credits per year for four years.  Students' year of study is based on the number of credits they have earned towards their current degree.  Students are "promoted" to the next year of study when they are within six of the required number of credits for that year.  For example, a student who has earned 54 credits is considered to be a third year (junior) student.

A) Questions about Selecting Your Courses... 

 
A1)  How do I know what courses I should take?

This website has been designed to guide you through the process of selecting and registering in appropriate courses. Step 2 will identify any courses which are required for your program as well as options you can consider for your remaining courses this year.

A2)  How do I choose my courses if I haven't decided on my major?

In the "BA with Major" and the "BSc with Major" programs you don’t formally select a major until the end of first year. If you're not sure what you want to study, use your first year as an opportunity to take courses in a variety of subjects. Remember that there are no wrong choices. In fact, some students do not find their true interests until second year.  You are easily able to change your choice of major at the end of second year, and can often do so quite seamlessly even later.

A3)  There is a course listed in the Academic Calendar but it is not in the Course Timetable. How do I register for it?

The Academic Calendar lists all courses which can be offered at StFX, and while most are offered every year, some are not. The Course Timetable lists those which are actually being offered. If your course of choice is not being offered in the current year, you will need to select another appropriate course that is being offered.

 

B) Questions about Registering in Your Selected Courses... 

 

B1)  How can I find out my registration start time?

Individual registration start times will be assigned to new first year students by noon on July 7th. You will then be able to see your start time by logging into Banner Self-Service, using your username and PIN, and selecting "Check Your RegistrationTime" from the menu. Your username and PIN were mailed to you in your Confirmation Letter. If you don't have your letter you can email us at nsr@stfx.ca or call the toll-free Registration Assistance Help Center at 844-888-7337.

B2)  I won't have access to the internet at my registration start time.  What should I do?

You should select your courses (including some alternatives) by following the steps on this web site, and leave that information, along with your username, PIN and your registration start time with a family member or trusted friend who can register on your behalf. (You can subsequently change your PIN if you wish).

If this is not an option, you can call our toll-free Registration Help Centre at 844-888-7337 on or after your registration start time, and a registration assistant can register you in your courses.

B3)  I am locked out of mesAmis/Banner Self-Service because I typed my username and PIN incorrectly a couple of times. What can I do?

Email us at nsr@stfx.ca or call our toll-free Registration Help Centre at 844-888-7337 and we will reset your PIN.

B4)  How do I cancel my course registration if I decide before September that I won't be attending?

Just go into Banner Self-Service and drop all of your courses. Don't forget to click "Submit" at the bottom of the page, and to check to ensure that the courses are actually removed from your registration.  If you do this before the end of the first week of classes (see the Calendar of Events in the Academic Calendar for exact date), you will not be charged tuition fees and the dropped courses will not be recorded on your academic record (transcript). 

B5)  How can I make changes to my course registration?

In Banner Self-Service, you can add or drop first term or full year courses until the end of the first week of classes in September. Second term courses can be changed until the end of the first full week of classes in January. See the Calendar of Events in the Academic Calendar for exact dates.

B6)  What do I do if the course I want to take is “Closed” (it has reached its enrollment capacity)?

You can request an override by completing a Course Override Request Form which is available in mesAMIS. Complete the form and copy and paste it into an e-mail to the applicable department chair. If the override is approved by the department chair, you will be notified by email and will then be able to register online in the course in the usual way.  In the meantime, you should register for an alternate course in case your override is not approved.

B7)  I am getting registration error messages that I don’t understand. Are they described anywhere?

Yes, click here for a description of the various error messages and what you should do.

B8)  I’ve registered for a course, so why is it not showing up on my schedule?

Most likely it’s an online course, or an HKIN activities (skills) course. Online courses are designated with a "66" or "67" as the section number.

If it is an HKIN activities course, it won't appear in the timeblocks on your personal course schedule since these are not offered in the standard terms. However, the details will appear on the list of courses which is the second page of your course schedule.  You will need to manually write them in on your timeblock schedule sheet.

B9)  Can I audit a course?

Auditing a course means that you may attend the course without working toward or expecting to earn credits. You are basically there to listen, though you can participate in class discussion if you wish. The final grade will be listed on your transcript as "AU" and you will not earn any credit for the course.

Normally, only courses without labs or hands-on components can be audited. The audit fees are one-half the usual tuition fee. Call or email the Registration Help Centre for further assistance if you wish to audit a course.

B10)  Can I "challenge" a course (i.e., just write an exam to get credit, without attending the course)?

There is no provision at StFX to "challenge" a course.

B11)  Can I take more than 30 credits in the first year (other than students in engineering)?

First-year students (other than students in engineering) are not permitted to enroll in more than 30 credits in the academic year (September - April).

B12)  How will I know in what rooms my classes will be held?

The building name and room number are shown for each class in the Course Timetable. Once you are registered in a course, the location will also show on your personal class schedule in mesAMIS.

B13)  I have classes back-to-back.  Is there enough time to get across campus?

Unless you have mobility issues, this will not present a problem.  All of our buildings are in close enough proximity to each other to allow you to go from one to another in the time allotted between classes. If you have a documented disability, you may wish to contact the Tramble Rooms - Centre for Accessible Learning. The staff there can assist you with student-centred support such as registration assistance, advocacy, physical accessibilty arrangements and much, much more. The phone number is (902) 867-5349. Also see the website at http://sites.stfx.ca/accessible_learning/.

B14)  I have a scheduled lab as my first class for one of my courses.  Do I actually start that course with a lab?

No.  There are no first-year science labs during the first week of classes.  For that week, you will attend lectures only.  Your professor will let you know when the first lab will be held.

  

C) Questions about Terminology Used ...

 

C1)  What is the difference between a lecture and a lab?

Courses can have lectures and labs. If a course has a lab you MUST register in it at the same time as you register in the lecture.

Lectures are usually classroom-based, where your professor will instruct you in a classroom setting.

Labs are more individual course components that supplement your lecture . A lab is often where you will practice what you've learned in your lectures or be able to ask questions about course material.

Make sure both the lecture and the lab fit into your schedule.

C2)  What constitutes a full-time student? What is meant by a normal full course load? Are they different?

Yes, they are different....

A student's full time/part time status is based on the number of credits in which they are registered for the full academic year (September - April) and is usually defined as 60% of a normal full course load.  For undergraduate programs at StFX, full-time status is 18 credits (60% of a normal full course load of 30 credits).

Only students carrying at least 24 credits are considered for entrance and in-course scholarships.  A minimum of 24 credits is also required to be considered for the Dean's List.

For the purpose of assessing tuition and other fees, enrollment in 24 or more credits is considered to be full time.

For the purpose of student loans, 18 to 24 credits or 60 percent to 80 percent of the normal full course load, may be considered full time by agencies which administer loan programs. (Check with our Financial Aid Office if you are unsure of the requirements for your particular loan program.)

For purposes of reporting to government agencies and for obtaining a student permit (for international students), full time is defined as 60% of a normal full course load (18 credits or more, in most programs).

C3)  What is a "......."?

If there is a term you don't understand, check the Glossary of Terms here.

C4)  What day of the week is “R”?

Thursday…Tuesday is “T”.

C5)  What does “TBA” mean on the timetable?

It can mean "To Be Announced" or "Not Applicable" (e.g., room numbers for online courses).

  

D) Questions about Next Steps...

 

D1)  Will I be able to see an Advisor in September if I need any clarification regarding my course selections?

You should be able to select your courses following the steps on this website. However, if you have any questions or are still unsure, you will have the opportunity to see an advisor when you arrive on campus in September.  If you have questions prior to that, you may also wish to make an in-person or phone appointment over the summer.  You can schedule an advising appointment using their online booking system.

D2)  Is orientation mandatory?

It is highly recommended. You will learn about campus life, meet new friends, get important information about the campus and have a lot of fun.

D3)  When do classes start?

Tuesday, September 5. Check your personal class schedule on Banner Self-Service or mesAMIS to see when and where your classes are.

  

Registration Help Centre June 12th - Sep 04

 

After September 4, visit the Registrar's office in NH312

or by email: registr@stfx.ca

Please include your Student ID number in all correspondence.